Terry O'Banion

President Emeritus and Senior League Fellow League for Innovation in the Community College

Distinguished Professor and Chair of the Graduate Faculty National American University

Senior Advisor, Higher Education Programs, Walden University


Email: obanion@league.org
Phone: (949) 387-3690
 

BRIEF BIO

Dr. Terry O’Banion was President of the League for Innovation in the Community College for 23 years until his retirement. Under his leadership the League became an international organization serving over 700 colleges recognized by Change magazine in 1998 as “the most dynamic organization in the community college world.” Since retirement O’Banion has worked on special projects for the League for Innovation, MetLife Foundation, The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, The Chauncey Group International, and Walden University.

In honor of his decades of service to education, four national awards have been established in his name: the Terry O’Banion Student Technology Award created by Microsoft; the Terry O’Banion Prize for Teaching and Learning created by Educational Testing Service; the Terry O’Banion Shared Journey Award created by the National Council on Student Development; and the O’Banion Leadership Scholarship created by Walden University.

In a survey of 11,000 higher education leaders reported in Change magazine in January 1998, Terry O’Banion was named one of eleven “Idea Champions” who set the agenda for all of higher education—and the only community college leader on the list.

O’Banion has consulted in more than 800 community colleges in the United States and Canada. He is one of the leading spokespersons in the country on the Learning College and has keynoted conferences on the Learning College in dozens of states and Canadian provinces and in Australia, the United Arab Emirates, and Japan.  He is currently a major presenter on Student Success Pathways and the Completion Agenda.

Author of 14 books and over 170 monographs, chapters, and articles on the community college, his 1997 book, A Learning College for the 21st Century, was awarded the Phillip E. Frandson Award for Literature in the Field of Continuing Higher Education.  His most recent book, Focus on Learning: A Learning College Reader, co-edited with Cynthia Wilson, was published by the League for Innovation in 2011.

O’Banion has served as a dean of students at Central Florida Community College, founding dean at Santa Fe Community College (FL), and vice chancellor for education for the Dallas County Community College District.  He has been a Professor of Higher Education at the University of Illinois; Distinguished Visiting Professor at The University of Texas; Visiting Professor at Berkeley, Florida State, Hawaii, and Toronto; the Marie Y. Roberts Endowed Professor of Higher Education at the University of North Texas; and a Distinguished Scholar-in-Residence at Antioch University McGregor School of Management.

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PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

2013 - Present
Consultant as a Thought Leader, Educational Testing Service

2000 - Present
Senior Advisor, Programs in Higher Education, Walden University

2010 - 2012
Consultant, The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation

1999 - Present            
President Emeritus and Senior League Fellow, League for Innovation in the Community College, Mission Viejo, California.

1976 - 1999
President and CEO, League for Innovation in the Community College, Mission Viejo, California.

1990 – 2010
Distinguished Visiting Professor, The University of Texas at Austin

1981 - 1983 
Vice Chancellor of Educational Affairs, Dallas County Community College District - Dallas, Texas.

1975 - 1981 
Executive Director, League for Innovation in the Community College, Los Angeles, California.

1967 - 1975 
Professor of Higher Education, University of Illinois - Urbana, Illinois

1973 - 1981
National Lecturer, Nova University Community College Program

1972 - 1973
Visiting Professor, University of California at Berkeley

1970 - 1977
Adjunct Professor, Union Graduate School - Yellow Springs, Ohio

1972
Summer Visiting Professor, University of Lethbridge - Alberta, Canada

1968
Summer Visiting Professor, University of Hawaii

1967
Summer Visiting Professor, Florida State University

1965 - 1967
Dean of Students, Santa Fe Junior College - Gainesville, Florida

1961 - 1965 
Dean of Students, Central Florida Junior College - Ocala, Florida

1958 - 1961
High School Teacher of English and Psychology - Hendry County Public Schools, Florida

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CURRENT PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

  • National Advisory Board—General Education Maps and Markers Initiative funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation—American Association of Colleges & Universities—2014—2016
  • National Advisory Committee—Faculty Voices Initiative funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation—League for Innovation in the Community College—2014—2016
  • Editorial Board—Liberal Education—2013--present
  • National Advisory Committee — Community College Leadership Program — National American University — 2012
  • National Review Committee — Completion by Design — The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation — 2011
  • National Advisory Committee — Completion by Design — The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation — 2011
  • National Distinguished Advocate — Center for Renewal and Wholeness in Higher Education — 2009
  • Distinguished Fellow — Institute of Higher Education — University of Florida — 2007-2008
  • TIAA-CREF Institute Fellow — 2005
  • Distinguished Scholar-in-Residence, Antioch University, McGregor School of Management — 2001-2005
  • 2002 Leadership Award — National Institute for Leadership Development
  • Marie Y. Roberts Endowed Professor of Higher Education — University of North Texas – 2000
  • Panel Member — Theodore M. Hesburgh Award
  • Editorial Board — Liberal Education
  • Advisory Board — University of Toronto Program in Higher Education for Community College Leaders
  • Advisory Council Member — Equipped for the Future Project — University of Maine
  • Education Policy Council — IBM
  • Community College Advisory Board — The College Board
  • Advisory Board — Community College Research Center, Teachers College, Columbia University
  • Advisory Board — Community College Career Corridors for Teacher Recruitment
  • Advisory Board — The Employer Workforce Development Initiative
  • Editorial Board — On the Horizon

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PAST PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

  • AACJC Commission on the Future of the Community College
  • Advisory Committee - Project on Integrating Women's Studies into the Community College Curriculum
  • Consulting Editor - The Journal of Higher Education
  • Guest Editor - Trustee Quarterly
  • Editorial Board - Journal of General Education
  • Co-Editor - Community College Student Personnel Newsletter
  • Editorial Board - Journal of College Student Personnel
  • Co-Chair, Community College Advisory Board - Jostens Learning
  • Member - AACJC/ACCT Data Collection and Policy Analysis Ad Hoc Study Committee
  • Chairman - LBJ Library Museum/Community College Project Development Committee
  • National Advisory Committee - Community College Productivity Center
  • National Advisory Committee - Leaders for the 80's
  • National Advisory Committee - Media Systems Corporation
  • National Advisory Committee - Junior College/ERIC, UCLA
  • Co-Chair - Two-Year College Development Center, Albany, New York
  • HEW Advisory Committee on Student Internships
  • National Advisory Panel - Station/College Executive Project in Adult Learning
  • Advisory Committee - AACTion Consortium, Student Development Program
  • Senator - American College Personnel Association<
  • Reviewer - Prentice-Hall, Holbrook Press, Houghton-Mifflin

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HONORS 

  • The John Roueche and Terry O'Banion Leadership Award — Created by the League for Innovation in the Community College — 2013
  • The John Roueche and Terry O’Banion Leadership Award — Created by the League for Innovation in the Community College — 2013
  • The Terry O'Banion Leadership Scholarship — Walden University 2010
  • Extraordinary Faculty Award — Richard W. Riley College of Education and Leadership, Walden University — 2009
  • Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters — Walden University — 2005
  • The O’Banion Prize for Teaching and Learning — An Annual Award Created by the Educational Testing Service — 1999
  • The Terry O’Banion Student Technology Award — An Annual Award Created by Microsoft — 1999
  • The Terry O’Banion Shared Journey Award — An Annual Award Created by The National Council on Student Development — 1999
  • Lifetime Special Leadership Award — American Association of Community Colleges — 1999
  • Distinguished Educator — College of Education, Florida State University — 1999
  • The B. Lamar Johnson Award for Leadership in Innovation — League for Innovation in the Community College — 1999
  • Outstanding Leadership Award — Association of Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology of Ontario — 1999
  • Honorary Degrees from Central Florida Community College, Santa Fe Community College, and Humber College of Applied Arts and Technology - 1999
  • One of 11 “Idea Champions” Who Set the Agenda for All of Higher Education — Change Magazine — 1998
  • The Acorn Award – The College Board – 1998
  • Lifetime Achievement Award – North Carolina State University – 1998
  • Leadership Award - American Association of Community Colleges
  • Interassociation Medallion Award for Outstanding Achievement in Student Development – ACPA, AACC, and NASPA – 1992
  • Distinguished Service Award - AACC's Council of Colleges and Universities
  • Leadership Award - National Council of Instructional Administrators
  • Presidents Award - AACC's National Council for Student Development
  • Lifetime Honorary Member – National Council for Staff, Program, and Organizational Development
  • International Leadership Award - National Institute for Staff and Organizational Development
  • Outstanding Books in Education – 1973
  • Outstanding Teacher at University of Illinois (1967-75)
  • Phi Delta Kappa
  • Kappa Delta Pi
  • NDEA fellow
  • University Fellow and Kellogg Fellow – Florida State University
  • Presidents and Deans of American Colleges and Universities
  • Who's Who in American Education

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EDUCATION

B.A.-- (cum laude) English and Speech - University of Florida - 1958

M.Ed.-- Guidance and Counseling - University of Florida - 1961

Ph.D. -- Administration in Higher Education - Florida State University - 1966

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BIBLIOGRAPHY

BOOKS

O'Banion T. (Ed.) (2013) Academic advising: The key to student success. American Association of Community Colleges: Washington, D. C. 159 pages.

O’Banion, T. & Wilson, C. (Eds.) (2011)  Focus on learning: A learning college reader. League for Innovation in the Community College: Phoenix, AZ, 228 pages.

O’Banion, T. (2009) The rogue trustee: The elephant in the room.  League for Innovation in the Community College: Phoenix, AZ, 104 pages.

A Learning College for the 21st Century.  Oryx Press:  American Council on Education and American Association of Community Colleges:  Washington, D.C. 1997, 260pp.  (Awarded the 1998 Phillip E. Frandson Award for Literature in the Field of Continuing Higher Education by the University Continuing Education Association.)

Teaching and Learning in the Community College.  (ed.)  American Association of Community Colleges:  Washington, D.C., 1994, 323 pp.

Innovation in the Community College.  (ed.) Macmillan Publishing Company:  New York, New York, 1989, 294 pp.

Perspectives on Student Development.  New Directions for Community Colleges  with William Deegan.  Jossey-Bass:  San Francisco, Number 67, Fall 1989, 108 pp.

Community College Staff Development Programs for the 80s, et al., Associated Faculty Press, Inc.:  Frederick, Maryland, 1981, 160 pp.

Developing Staff Potential.  New Directions for Community Colleges,  (ed.)  Jossey-Bass:  San Francisco, Number 19, Autumn 1977, 115 pp.

Student Development Programs in Illinois Community Colleges. (ed.) Illinois Junior College Board:  Springfield, Illinois, 1972, 150 pp.

The People Who Staff the People’s College:  A Report to the National Advisory Council for Education Professions Development.  EPDA Advisory Council:  Washington, D.C., 1972, 215 pp.

Teachers for Tomorrow:  Staff Development in the Community Junior College.  University of Arizona Press: Tucson, 1972, 185 pp. (Selected by the United States Information Agency as part of the American Education Book Exhibit to be displayed in twenty-six countries.  Selected as one of the Outstanding Books in Education for 1973.)

Student Development Programs in Community Junior Colleges, with Alice Thurston, Prentice-Hall:  Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, 1972, 235 pp.

New Directions in Community College Student Personnel Programs.  American College Personnel Association:  Washington, D.C., Student Personnel Series No. 15, 1971, 79 pp.

The Shared Journey:  An Introduction to Encounter, with April O’Connell, Prentice-Hall:  Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, 1970, 203 pp.

MONOGRAPHS AND REPORTS

O'Banion, T. (2013) Access, Success, and Completion: A Primer for Community College Faculty, Administrators, Staff, and Trustees. Chandler, AZ: League for Innovation in the Community College. The 2014 Bellwether Book Award from the Community College Futures Assembly

O’Banion, T. & Weidner, L. (2010) The nature of innovation in the community college.  Phoenix, AZ: League for Innovation in the Community College

O’Banion, T., Barnett, E. & Kempner, K.  Sustaining College and Career Transitions: The Final Qualitative Report of CCTI.  League for Innovation in the Community College: Phoenix, Arizona, December 2007, 57pp.

O’Banion, T., Barnett, E. & Bragg, D.  The College and Career Transitions Initiative:  Third Year Report—Case Studies.  League for Innovation in the Community College: Phoenix, Arizona, October 2005, 15 pp.

The League for Innovation:  Perched at the Millennium.  League for Innovation in the Community College, 1999, 14 pp. 

Launching a Learning-Centered College.  League for Innovation in the Community College and PeopleSoft, Inc.:  Mission Viejo, California, 1999, 42 pp.

Creating More Learning-Centered Community Colleges.  League for Innovation in the Community College and PeopleSoft, Inc.:  Mission Viejo, California, 1997, 39 pp.

The Learning Revolution:  A Guide for Community College Trustees.  Special Issue Trustee Quarterly Issue 1, 1997, Association of Community College Trustees:  Washington, D.C., 20 pp.

A Renaissance of Innovation.  Compiled for the Annual Conference of the Association of California Community College Administrators, Irvine, California, February 26, 1987, 41 pp.

A Renaissance of Innovation.  Report of the Executive Director:  The League for Innovation in the Community College:  Laguna Hills, California, May 1985, 8 pp.

The Community College and the Computer:  Planning for the Future.  The League for Innovation in the Community College:  Laguna Hills, California, April 8, 1985, 18 pp.

A Tradition of Excellence Through Innovation.  Report of the Executive Director:  The League for Innovation in the Community College:  Laguna Hills, California, May 12, 1984, 7 pp.

Toward the League’s Silver Anniversary:  1983 - 1993.  The League for Innovation in the Community College:  Dallas, Texas, May 1983, 27 pp.

Organizing Staff Development Programs That Work.  AACJC:  Washington, D.C., 1978, 32 pp.

Staff Development Resource Inventory and Directory 1977.  League for Innovation:  Los Angeles, 1977, 30 pp.

Emerging Models of Community College Staff Development Programs, with J. T. Vaughn, University of Illinois:  Urbana, 1975, 110 pp.

Staff Development at Lincoln Trail College.  University of Illinois:  Urbana, June 1974, 82 pp.

An Evaluation of the Purdue University EPDA Project on the Mini-course and Audio-tutorial Instruction.  Purdue University:  Lafayette, Indiana, October 15, 1973, 116 pp.

The People Who Staff the People’s College:  A Summary Report to the Congress.  EPDA Advisory Council:  Washington, D.C., 1972, 16 pp.

Junior College Student Personnel Programs in Colorado.  Colorado State Board for Community Colleges and Occupational Education:  Denver, Colorado, June 1969, 13 pp.

A Senior Partner in the Junior College:  Student Personnel Services.  Santa Fe Junior College:  Gainesville, Florida, 1967, 45 pp.

A Proposal for the AAJC Student Personnel Project.  American Association of Junior Colleges:  Washington, D.C., 1965, 25 pp.

CHAPTERS IN BOOKS

O’Banion, T. (2011) Focus on learning: The core mission of higher education.  In Focus on Learning: A Learning College Reader.  Terry O'Banion & Cynthia Wilson (eds.)  League for Innovation in the Community College: Phoenix, AZ,  pp. 3-8.

O’Banion, T et al (2010) The learning landscape of community colleges. In Handbook of Adult and Continuing Education—2010 Edition.  Carol Kasworn, Amy Rose, & Jovita Ross-Gordon (eds.) A publication of the American Association for Adult and Continuing Education.  Sage Publications: Thousand Oaks, CA.  pp. 231-241.

Chapters on Information Technology: Central Piedmont Community College, Corning Community College, Southwestern Oregon Community College in Pathways to Student Success:  Case Studies from the College and Career Transitions Initiative,  Laurance J. Warford (ed.), League for Innovation in the Community College: Phoenix, Arizona, 2006  pp.67-118.

Chapters on Law, Public Safety, and Security:  Fox Valley Technical College, Price George’s Community College, San Diego Miramar College in Pathways to Student Success:  Case Studies from the College and Career Transitions Initiative,  Laurance J. Warford (ed.), League for Innovation in the Community College:  Phoenix, Arizona, 2006  pp. 119-158.

“Transforming the Community College from a Teaching to a Learning Institution” in The Learning Revolution, Diana G. Oblinger and Sean C. Rush (eds.), Anker Publishing Company, Inc.:  Boston, Massachusetts, 1997, pp. 138-154.

“Leadership Challenges for Student Development Professionals in the ‘90s” in From Vision  to  Reality:  Student Affairs Agenda for the ‘90s  Deborah L. Floyd (ed.),  American College Testing Program:  Iowa City, Iowa, 1994 pp. 67-71.

“The Renaissance of Innovation.”  Issues in Community College Administration, S. Gregory Bowes (ed.) Center for Community College Leadership, The University of New Mexico:  Albuquerque, New Mexico, Spring 1989, pp. 1-31.

“Student Development Philosophy:  A Perspective on the Past and Future” in Toward the Future Vitality of Student Development Services:  Summary Report of a Colloquium held at Traverse City, Michigan, John S. Keyser (ed.), The American College Testing Program:  Iowa City, Iowa, 1985, pp. 5-11.  Reprinted in Perspectives on Student Development.  New Directions for Community Colleges with William Deegan.  Jossey-Bass:  San Francisco, No. 67, Fall 1989, pp. 5-17.

“Liontamers, Clowns, and High Wire Artists:  A Profile of the Academic Manager.”  Proceeding of Academic Chairpersons:  Administrative Responsibilities.  January 25-27, 1984.  Orlando, Florida, Hosted by Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development and Issues in Higher Education, Division of Continuing Education, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas, Volume 13, Part I, August 1984, pp. 1-10.

“The Role of the Chief Executive Officer in Strategic Staff Development,”  with Nancy Armes, New Directions for Community Colleges, Gundar Myran (ed.), Number 44, December 1983, pp. 87-101.

“Obstacles to General Education,” with Ruth Shaw, New Directions for Community Colleges, B. Lamar Johnson (ed.), No. 40, December 1982, pp. 59-71.

“Innovations in Humanistic Education,” in Contemporary Issues in Postsecondary Education, Maxwell C. King and Robert L. Breuder (eds.), Brevard Community College:  Cocoa, Florida, 1976, pp. 56-66.

 “Alternative Forms of Graduate Education for Community College Staff: A Descriptive Review,” in Graduate Education in Community Colleges: Cooperative Approaches to Community College Staff Development, S.V. Martorano, et al, (eds.), Technical Report No. 5, National Board on Graduate Education, August 1975, pp. 48-62.

“Staff Development: A Priority on Persons,” Educational Opportunity for All: New Staff Development for New Students, Roger Yarrington (ed.), American Association of Community and Junior Colleges: Washington, D.C., 1974, pp. 23-0.

“Counseling and the Emerging Model of Student Development,” New Directions for Community Colleges, 2:4, Winter 1974, pp. 25-34.

“Staff Development for Student Development,” Education in Transition: Search for a New Balance Proceedings of the Fourth Annual Institute on the Community College, Sarnia, Ontario, June 11-14, 1973, pp. 21-42. Also in Community College Frontiers, 2:2 Winter 1974, pp. 12-20.

“Patterns of Staff Development,” New Directions for Community Colleges, 1:1, Spring 1973, pp. 9-29.

“Organizing Student Development in the Community College,” The Bicultural Student Personnel Specialist in the Community Junior College, Robert R. Reilley (ed.), Texas A & M University: College Station, Texas, 1973, pp. 31-42.

“Student Activity Programs in the Community College,” Proceedings of the Two-Year Postsecondarv Education Institute, University of Minnesota: Rochester, 1973, pp. 28-39.

“Preparing Staff for the Community Junior College,” Changing Patterns in Foreign Language Programs, Wilga M. Rivers (ed.), Newbury House: Rowley, Massachusetts, 1972, pp. 120-133.

“Academic Advising: We Use Counselors,” with Joseph W. Fordyce in Perspectives on the Community Junior College, William Ogilvie and Max Raines (eds.), Appleton, Century, Crofts: New York, 1971, pp. 364-368.

“The Junior College - A Humanizing Institution,” A Day at Santa Fe, Joseph W. Fordyce (ed.) Santa Fe Junior College, Gainesville, Florida, 1971, pp. 165-183.

“Self-revealment as a Step Toward Encountering,” Reprinted from The Shared Journey In Significance: The Struggle We Share, John H. Brennecke and Robert C. Amick (eds.), Glencoe Press, 1971, pp. 122-127.

 “Organizations for Student Personnel Workers,” College Student Personnel: Readings and Bibliographies. Walter Johnson (ed.), et al. Houghton Mifflin: January 1970, pp. 376-379.

“Institutional Governance and the Community College,” Student Participation in Governance, Patricia Graham (ed.), United States National Student Association: Washington, D.C., April 1970, pp. 1-19. Also in Community College Governance: The Local Board. Occasional Paper No. 12, Center for Development of Community College Education, University of Washington, July 1969, pp. 37-58.

“Exceptional Practices in Junior College Student Personnel Programs,” Student Personnel Work in the 70s, James Harvey (ed.), Harper College, December 1968, pp. 5-17.

ARTICLES

O’Banion, T.  (October 13, 2013)  Interview comments in Twelve Important Questions for Sixteen Community College Leaders: Part II of an Exploration of Community College Issues, Trends & Strategies (Ed.) G. Lorenzo,  Austin, TX:  The Roueche Graduate Center, National American University.

O’Banion, T.  (May 13, 2013) Completion begins and ends in the classroom.  Commentary:  Community College Times.

O’Banion, T. & Wilson, C. (April 2013) The case for on-time registration.  Leadership Abstracts V26 N4.

O’Banion, T.  (April 1, 2013)  Point of View:  Picking the low hanging fruit.  Community College Week.

O’Banion, T. (October/November 2012) Updating the traditional academic advising model for the 21st century.  Community College Journal.

O’Banion, T. (November 2012)  Rallying faculty and securing resources for the completion agenda. 
Leadership Abstracts.

O’Banion, T. (April 16, 2012) The community college completion agenda: Our Andy Warhol
moment. Liberal.educationnation—a blog from the LEAP Initiative.  Washington, D. C.: American
Association of Colleges & Universities.  http://blog.aacu.org/index.php/2012/04/16/the-community
college-completion-agenda/

O’Banion, T.  (May 10, 2012) A tribute to John and Suanne Roueche.  Diverse Issues in Higher Education. V29, N7  pp.46-47.

O’Banion, T.  (2012) Foreword to The engaged teacher: What works with today’s students.  N. Vader-McCormick. Stillwater, OK: New Forums Press, Inc.

O’Banion, T. (April 2012) The leader as archeologist: Digging into the college culture.  Leadership Abstracts, V25, N4.

O’Banion, T.  (January 2012) Change and the completion agenda. Leadership Abstracts, v25,n1, League for Innovation in the Community College.

O’Banion, T.  (October 17, 2011) I am a community college student.  Reprinted in Community College Week

O’Banion, T.  (2011)  Foreword.  Le Movement.  Paul Elsner:  Phoenix, Arizona

O’Banion, T. (August 26, 2011)  I am a community college student.  Innovation Abstracts.  Austin, TX:  National Institute for Staff and Organizational Development.

O’Banion, T. (August/September, 2011)  Guidelines to boosting student success pathways to completion.  Community College Journal.  pp. 28-34.

O’Banion, T. (2011) Learning, teaching, and college completion. A Briefing Paper for the AACC’s      21st Century Commission on the Future of the Community College.  Washington, D. C.: American Association of Community Colleges.

O’Banion, T., Weidner, L., & Wilson, C. (2011) The impact of innovation. Community College Journal of Research and Practice.  (In press)

O’Banion, T. (June 2011)  The rogue trustee: What can the faculty do?  Leadership Abstracts, v24, n6. League for Innovation in the Community College.

O’Banion, T, Weidner, L., & Wilson, C. (April 2011) Creating a culture of innovation in the community college. Community College Journal of Research and Practice. v35, n4. pp. 470-483.

O’Banion, T. (August 16, 2010) The completion agenda: To what end?  Inside Higher Ed.

O’Banion, T., Weidner, L., & Wilson, C. (Fall 2010) Who are the innovators? The Community College Enterprise. pp. 33-42.

O’Banion, T.  (Winter 2010) Balance of power: Surviving a rogue trustee.  The Presidency 13(1)  pp.32-34

O’Banion, T. (Summer 2010)  The faculty and the rogue trustee.  Journal of the Faculty Association of California Community Colleges.

O’Banion, T. (Spring 2010)  Memo to a rogue trustee.  Board Focus, p. 8.

O’Banion, T. (2009, December). Are there rogues on your board? Principal Leadership, 10(4). Retrieved from http://www.principals.org/Content.aspx?topic=61064

O’Banion. T. (October/November 2009) Disruptive forces: College leaders feel the impact of rogue trustees. Community College Journalpp. 32-39.

O’Banion, T. (October 2, 2009) On the value of reinventing the wheel.  Innovation Abstracts,  VXXXl, N21, (Reissued in a special series; originally published in March 1986)

O’Banion, T. (Spring 2009) Leaders who love learning.  The John Ben Shepperd Journal of Practical Leadership, pp. 48-55.

O’Banion, T.  (2009) Strategies for dealing with rogue trustees.  Community College Journal of Research and Practice V33, pp.823-850.

O’Banion, T. (2009) Damage caused by the rogue trustee.  Community College Journal of Research and Practice V33, N7, pp. 547-563.

O’Banion, T. (2009) What motivates the community college rogue trustee? Community College Journal of Research and Practice V33, N6, pp. 476-501.

O’Banion, T. (2009) Foreword: Imagine Success:  Engaging Entering Students,  Austin, Texas:  Center for Community College Student Engagement.

O’Banion, T. (April 20, 2009) The rogue trustee: Can we talk? Community College Week V21, N17.

O’Banion, T.  (April 2009) Let the conversation begin: How do we deal with a rogue trustee?  Leadership Abstracts V22, N4 League for Innovation in the Community College.

O’Banion, T. & Weidner, L.  (December 2009) The nature of innovation in the community college. Leadership Abstracts V22, N12 League for Innovation in the Community College

Pfahl, N., McClenney, K., O’Banion, T., Sullivan, L., & Wilson, C.  The learning landscape of community colleges, Handbook of Adult and Continuing Education (In Press)

“Foreword”  Student Services Dialogues: Community College Case Studies to Consider.  R. Thomas Flynn & Gerardo E. de los Santos (Eds.)  Phoenix, AZ:  League for Innovation in the Community College, 2008

New College Leaders Face Prickly New Dilemmas,” Community College Times, August 29, 2008, p. 6.

Dancing with Porcupines,” Community College Week, August 25, 2008, p. 4.

“Four Decades of Innovation: Impact of the League for Innovation,” with Gerardo E. de los Santos, Community College Journal, April/May 2008, pp. 35-40.

“Early Stirrings of Student Development in the Community College:  The Role of Central Florida Community College,”  National Council on Student Development and Office of Community College Research and Leadership, University of Illinois, October 2007,  pp.1-8

“Leadership for Learning: What It Takes To Build a Learning College,”  Community College Journal,  V78 #2, October/November 2007, pp.45-47.

“Creating a New Architecture for the Learning College,”  Community College Journal of Research and Practice,  V31, #9,  September 2007, pp.713-724.

“Crisis and Calamity in the Community College:  Preparing Faculty and Administrators for the 21st Century,”  Community College Journal, V77, # 3, December 2006/January 2007, pp. 44-47.

“Creating a New Architecture for the Learning College,” Princeton, NJ: Educational Testing Service, 2006, pp. 1-13.

“Leadership for Learning,” Princeton, NJ: Educational Testing Service, 2006, pp. 1-8.

“Melding Sound Learning Theory and Practices,”  Community College Journal, V 76, # 2, October/November 2005

“Foreword”  The Seventh Learning College Principle: A Framework for Transformational Change.  Alicia Harvey-Smith. NASPA: Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education: Washington, D. C. 2005

“Professional Development Goes Online,”  Community College Times,  September 27, 2005

“Making Good on the Promise: Learning-Centered Education for College Leaders,” with Jonathan Kaplan.  Community College Journal, April/May 2004,  pp.16-19.

“A Learning-Centered Ph. D. for Community College Leaders,” with Jonathan Kaplan.  Leadership Abstracts  World Wide Web Edition, V16 N9, September 2003

“Learning Colleges and Educational Change:  An Interview with Terry O’Banion,” Update on Research and Leadership. Interviewed by Doug Gardner and Elisabeth Barnett, University of Illinois, V14, N2, Spring 2003

“The Learning-Centered Institution: Ideas and Observations,”  Community College Journal,
      April/May, 2003, pp. 13-15.

“Leadership that Lasts:  Walk Softly and Carry a Big Shtick,”  Community College Journal, August/September, 2002,  pp. 34-37.

“College Conversations on Learning,” with Mark Milliron.  Learning Abstracts  V4 N5, 2001.

“An Inventory for Learning-Centered Colleges,” Community College Journal, September , 2000, pp.14-23.

“A Look Back and a Look Ahead: An Interview with Dr. Terry O’Banion,” Microsoft in Higher Education: Community College Page [On Line] December 1999.

“The Learning Revolution in American Higher Education,” Broadcast Journal of Scottish Further Education Unit, Issue 45, March 1999.

“The Learning College,” Broadcast Journal of Scottish Further Education Unit, Issue 46, June 1999

“Put Learning First: A Revolutionary Idea in Higher Education,” Women in Higher Education, September 1999.

“Foreword” Learning Is About Making Connections, Cross Papers Number 3, K. Patricia Cross, League for Innovation in the Community College:  Mission Viejo, California, June, 1999.

“The Learning College:  Both Learner and Learning Centered,” Leadership Abstracts V2 N2, March 1999.

“The Center of the Learning Revolution,” Community College Week, June 29, 1998.

“Foreword” Opening Windows on Learning, Cross Papers Number 2, K. Patricia Cross, League for Innovation in the Community College:  Mission Viejo, California, June 1998.

“A Learning College for the 21st Century:  An Interview with Dr. Terry O'Banion,” Microsoft in Higher Education:  Community College Page.  [On-Line] Available
http://www.microsoft.com/education/hed/news/apr98/ccbanion.htm.  April 1998.

“Community College Voices:  An Interview with Terry O'Banion,: CC: News by National Association for College Admission Counseling, V3 N2, Spring 1998.

“The Learning Revolution:  Perched at the Millennium,” Community College Week, January 12, 1998.

“Foreword” Developing Professional Fitness Through Classroom Assessment and Classroom Research, The Cross Papers Number 1, K. Patricia Cross, League for Innovation in the Community College, Mission Viejo, California, September 1997.

“The Purpose, Process, and Product of the Learning Revolution in the Community College,” Leadership Abstracts, V10 N7, June 1997.

 “Innovation and Educational Reform,” Academic Leadership:  Journal of the Chair Academy.  V4 N2 February 1997, pp. 4-11.

 “The People’s College and the Street People:  Community Colleges and Community Development—Part Two” with Rosemary Gillett-Karam.  Community College Journal, V67, N2, October/November 1996, pp. 33-37.

“The People’s College and the Street People:  Community Colleges and Community Development—Part One” with Rosemary Gillett-Karam.  Community College Journal, V67, N3, December/January 1996-97, pp. 26-30.

 “Is Teaching and Learning a Priority?  Conduct an Audit and Find Out,”  The Journal of Staff, Program, and Organization Development. V13, N4 1996, pp. 277-283.

“Gladly Would He Learn,” On the Horizon:  The Environmental Scanning Newsletter for Educational Leaders. V4, N1, January/February 1996, pp. 1-5.

“Foreword” The 21st Century Community College:  Technology and the New Learning Paradigm.  Larry Johnson and Sharon T. Lobello (eds.) White Plains, New York:  IBM, 1996 pp. iii-iv.

“Learning Communities, Learning Organizations, and Learning Colleges,” Leadership Abstracts.  V9 N8, August 1996.

“The Learning Revolution Comes to the Community College.”  Community College Week, August 26, 1996, pp. 4-5.

“A Learning College for the 21st Century,” Community College Journal, December/January 1995-96, pp. 18-23.  Reprinted in The 21st Century Community College:  Technology and the New Learning Paradigm.  Larry Johnson and Sharon T. Lobello (eds.) White Plains, New York:  IBM, 1996.

“School is Out:  Learning Is In,” On the Horizon:  The Environmental Scanning Newsletter for Educational Leaders.  V3, n5, June/July 1995, pp. 1-6.

“Is It Time to Leave the Presidency?”  Trustee Quarterly, Issue 3, 1995, pp. 6-8.

“Community Colleges Lead a Learning Revolution,” Educational Record, V76, n4, Fall 1995, pp. 23-27.

“An Academic Advising Model,” Reprinted in The Journal of the National Academic Advising Association, V4, n2, Fall 1994, pp. 10-16.  Featured as one of two classic articles of last 25 years.

“Retrospect and Prospect,” The Journal of the National Academic Advising Association, V4, n2, Fall 1994, pp. 117-119.

“Sustaining Innovation in Teaching and Learning," Leadership Abstracts, Vol. 7, No. 4. League for Innovation in the Community College: Mission Viejo, California, April, 1994.

“Honoring Retiring Presidents,” Trustee Quarterly, Winter 1994, pp. 2-7.

“Teaching and Learning: A Mandate for the Nineties,” Community College Journal, February/March 1994, pp. 20-25.

“Foreword,” Catalysts for Community Change: Guidelines for Community Colleges to Conduct Community Forums. The League for Innovation in the Community College:  Mission Viejo, California 1993.

“Selecting Presidents by Attrition,” Community, Technical, and Junior College Journal, April/May 1992.

“The Community College's Latest Mission,” The Trustee Quarterly, Summer 1991, p. 15.

“The Golden Age of Community Colleges,” The Trustee Quarterly, Spring 1990, pp. 17-18.

“The Quiet Revolution,” The Trustee Quarterly, Spring 1989, pp. 14-15.

“Retaining a Peak Performing President,” Leadership Abstracts Vol. 2, No. 16. League for Innovation in the Community College: Laguna Hills, California, September, 1989.

 “Retaining a Peak Performing President: A Special Challenge for Trustees of Outstanding Colleges,” The Trustee Quarterly, Fall 1989, pp. 7-11.

“Leaders for Critical Times: An Emerging Response,” with John E. Roueche. Community, Technical, and Junior College Journal, June-July 1988.

“Celebrating Two Decades of Innovation,” Community, Technical, and Junior College Journal, Feb./Mar 1988, Washington, D.C.

“Leadership Through Innovation: Improving the Record on Underprepared Students.” National Association for Developmental Education Newsletter, Vol. 12, No. 1, Spring 1988, pp. 1-6.

“Revitalizing Leadership for Community Colleges,” with John E. Roueche. Leadership Abstracts, Vol. 1, No. 1, League for Innovation in the Community College:  Laguna Hills, California, January, 1988.

“Community College,” The World Book Encyclopedia, Vol. 4, World Book, Inc., Chicago, Illinois, pp. 900-901, 1988.

“Foreword,” Celebrating Two Decades of Innovation, The League for Innovation in the Community College: Laguna Hills, California: pp. V-VI, 1988.

“Innovative Partnerships Assist Community College Computing Programs,” T.H.E. Journal, Vol. 14, No. 10, June 1987, pp. 56-59.

“Foreword,” Community College Programs for Underprepared Students, Kern Community College District:  Bakersfield, California, February 1987.

“Preface,” Guidelines for Library and Media Automated Systems, The League for Innovation in the Community College: Laguna Hills, California, October 1986.

“Preface,” Assuring Student Success in the Community College: The Role of Student Development Professionals, The League for Innovation in the Community College:  Laguna Hills, California, May 1987.

“Making Time for Excellence,” with Georgia Sims, The Journal of the College and University Personnel Association, Vol. 37, No. 1, Spring 1986, pp. 1-3.

“On the Value of Reinventing the Wheel,” Innovation Abstracts, National Institute for Staff and Organizational Development: The University of Texas at Austin, Vol. VIII, No. 9, March 21, 1986.

 “An Elitist Organization of Egalitarian Institutions: The League for Innovation as a Special Subculture in Higher Education,” League for Innovation in the Community College: Laguna Hills, California, August 1985, pp. 1-9.

“Preface,” Guidelines for the Development of Computerized Student Information Systems, The League for Innovation in the Community College:  Laguna Hills, California, October 1984.

“Confessions of a Technologically Disabled Person,” Innovation Abstracts. National Institute for Staff and Organizational Development: The University of Texas at Austin, Volume VI, No. 21, August 17, 1984.

“Increasing Productivity in the Community College,” Educational Record, Vol. 65, No. 2, Spring 1984, pp. 42-45.

“All May Come and All Will Be Served: The Public Community College in the United States,” translated into Chinese for the Journal of the Institute of Comparative Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, People's Republic of China, Vol. 1, 1983.

“The Continuing Quest for Quality,” Innovation Abstracts, National Institute for Staff and Organizational Development: The University of Texas at Austin, Vol. V, No. 16, May 13, 1983.

“Quest for Quality: Metamorphic Trip,” Community and Junior College Journal, September, 1983, pp. 30-31.

“Guidelines for Organizing Staff Development Programs,” Community and Junior College Journal, March 1982, pp. 19-21.

“An Interview with Terry O'Banion,” Journal of Developmental and Remedial Education, Vol. 3, No. 2, Winter 1979.

“Organizing Staff Development Programs that Work,” Innovation Abstracts, National Institute for Staff and Organizational Development: The University of Texas at Austin, Vol. 1, No. 15, December 7, 1979.

“What is Student Development?” ACPA Commission XI Newsletter, February 1979.

“The Energy Activists,” Change, February 1979, pp. 50-51.

 “All May Come and All Will Be Served: The Public Community College in the United States,” translated into Persian for distribution in Iran by the International Communication Agency, January 1979.

“Issues in Higher Education: Interview with Terry O'Banion,” NASPA FIELD REPORT, Vol. ii, No. 2, Spring 1978, 5 pp.

“Innovations in Humanistic Education,” The Community College Review, 5:3, Winter 1978, pp. 21-27.

Book Review, Second Best: The Crisis in the Community College by Stephen Zwerling, The Journal of Higher Education, July/August 1977, pp. 482-484.

“Staff Development:  A New Priority for the 70s,” The College Board Review, No. 99, Spring 1976, pp. 26-33.

Book Review, Dynamics of Learning, by Nathaniel Cantor, New York: Agathon Press, Inc., 1972, The Journal of Higher Education, December 1973, pp. 738-740.

“Teachers for Tomorrow: One Year Later,” Community and Junior College Journal, 44:3, November 1973, pp. 10-11.

“Staff Development: Priorities for the Seventies,” Community and Junior College Journal, October 1972, pp. 10-11.

“Foreword,” Characteristics of Community College Deans of Students, Alice Thurston, et al, Junior College ERIC: Los Angeles, 1972.

“An Overview of Academic Advising: The National Survey,” with Joseph Fordyce and Gregory Goodwin, Journal of College Student Personnel, 13:5, September 1972, pp. 411-419.

“Organizing and Administering Student Development Programs in the Community Junior College,” Peabody Journal of Education, 49:4, July 1972, pp. 268-278.

“An Academic Advising Model,” Junior College Journal, March 1972, pp. 62-69.

“A Junior College Course in Self-Development,” Improving College and University Teaching, XIX: 4, Autumn 1971, pp. 272-277.

“Humanizing Education in the Community College,” The Journal of Higher Education XLII:8, November 1971, pp. 657-668.

 “Purposes of College and University Student Personnel Workers,” NASPA Journal January 1971, pp. 206-212.

“Student Personnel Work: An Emerging Model,” with Alice Thurston and James Gulden, Junior College Journal, 41:3, November 1970, pp. 7-14.

“Integrating Pupil Personnel Services in our Secondary Schools,” with Merlin Schultz, IGPA Quarterly, Fall, No. 38, 1970, pp. 9-17.

“Functions of College and University Student Personnel Workers,” College and University, Spring 1970, pp. 296-304.

“Activating the Inactivists,” College Unions - 1970, Palo Alto, California, Association of College Unions - International, March 1970.

“What About the Junior Colleges?” Compact: Education Commission of the States, 3:5, October 1969, pp. 30-33.

“Transfer Students,” Junior College Research Review, 4:3, October 1969, pp. 10-12.

“Facilitating Faculty Development,” New Deans of Students: Old Problems, New Answers - Proceedings of the Invitational Conference, University of Florida, Gainesville, August 3-6, 1969, pp. 18-36.

“Program Proposal for Preparing College Student Personnel Workers,” Journal of College Student Personnel, July 1969, pp. 249-253.

“Rules and Regulation: Philosophy and Practice,” Junior College Journal, April 1969, pp. 11-15.

“Experiment in Orientation of Junior College Students,” Journal of College Student Personnel, January 1969, pp. 12-15.

“Bridge Building Needed in the Counseling Community,” with Gene Bottoms and Fred Otte, American Vocational Journal, December 1968, p. 29.

“For Adults Only,” Adult Leadership, 17:2, June 1968, pp. 57-58.

“Organizations for Student Personnel Workers,” Junior College Journal, 37:1, September 1966, pp. 19-20.

“The Student Personnel Night Rider Meets the Night Fighter,” Excellence in Continuing Education: Proceedings of the Kellogg Conference, University of Florida, August 1966, pp. 128-134.

KEYNOTE SPEECHES

NATIONAL/INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATIONS

American Association of Community Colleges
American College Personnel Association
American College Testing Program
American School Counselors Association
Association of Canadian Community Colleges
Association of College Unions - International
Association of Community College Trustees
Australian National Training Authority
Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation
Canadian Community College Institute
College Entrance Examination Board
Community College Futures Assembly
Conference Board
Conference on Teaching Excellence—Kentucky
Danforth Community College Institute
Danforth Foundation
First World Congress of Colleges and Polytechnics
Group Ten for the Seventies - Junior College Consortium
Mountain States Presidents Association
National Academic Advising Association
National Association of College Admissions Counselors
National Association of Community College Business Officers
National Association of Developmental Educators
National Association of Student Personnel Administrators
National Chair Academy
National Community College Hispanic Council
National Conference on Student Retention
National Conference on Students in Transition
National Council for Staff, Program, and Organizational Development
National Council on Student Development
The National Humanities Faculty
National Initiative for Leadership and Institutional Effectiveness
The National Institute for Staff and Organizational Development
National Institute of Mental Health
Nebraska - Kansas Junior College Consortium
New England Junior College Student Personnel Association
North Texas Community and Junior College Consortium
Northwest Community College Presidents Association
Southern Regional Education Board
TAFE Directors of Australia
United States National Student Association
United Arab Emirates
Washington Higher Education Secretariat
Western Australian Department of Training

STATE/PROVINCIAL ORGANIZATIONS

Alabama Community College Association
Alaska Community College System
Alberta Colleges and Institutes, Canada
Alberta Consortium of Junior Colleges, Canada
Arizona Community College Administrators
Arkansas Association of Two-Year Colleges
Association of California Community College Administrators
Association of Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology of Ontario-Canada
Association of Texas Junior College Board Members and Administrators
Association of Washington Community and Technical College Administrators
California College Personnel Association
California Community College Trustees
California Community College Chancellor's Office
California Community College Student Affairs Association
California Deans of Students Association
Colorado Junior College Board
Connecticut Technical-Community Colleges
Florida Association of Community Colleges
Florida Association of Student Development
Georgia Association of Two-Year Colleges
Illinois Trustees Association
Illinois Community College Administrators Association
Illinois Junior College Student Personnel Association
Iowa Junior College Student Personnel Association
Iowa State Department of Education
Kansas Community College Association
Leadership Academy: University of Kentucky Community College
Maryland Junior College Student Personnel Association
Massachusetts Commission on the Future of the State College and  Community College Systems
Michigan Community College Association
Montana Two-Year College Association
New Mexico Council of Independent Community Colleges
New York Community College Presidents Association
New York Community College Trustees Association
North Carolina Community College Presidents Association
North Carolina Community College System
North Carolina Junior College Student Personnel Association
Oregon Junior College Student Personnel Association
South Carolina Technical and Community College Department
State University and Community College System of Tennessee
Texas Community College Teachers Association
Texas Junior College Student Personnel Association
Texas Junior College Teachers Association
Two-Year College Student Development Center, New York
Utah Community College Association
University of Hawaii Community College System
University of Kentucky Community College System
Virginia Junior College System
Washington Junior College Personnel Association
Washington State Trustees and Presidents Association
Wisconsin Technical College System
Wyoming Community College Association

UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES

Appalachian State University
Auburn University
California State University of Los Angeles
Central Michigan University
Columbia University
Cornell University
East Texas State University
Eastern Michigan University
Huron College - South Dakota
Illinois State University
North Carolina State University at Raleigh
Osaka Gakuin University
Peabody College
Pepperdine University
State University of New York at Albany
Texas A & M University
University of California at Berkeley
University of California at Los Angeles
University of Colorado
University of Delaware
University of Florida
University of Illinois - Encounter Group Institute
University of Iowa
University of Minnesota
University of New Mexico
University of North Carolina at Greensborough
University of Northern Iowa
University of Southern California
University of Texas Community College Leadership Program
University of Toronto
Walden University
Wayne State University

COMMUNITY COLLEGES

Over 800 community colleges throughout the U.S. and Canada

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USING

In my consulting with over 800 community colleges and technical institutes over the past 40 + years, I am often asked to suggest various approaches to organizing what is usually a day-long staff development program. How the program is organized depends, of course, on the agenda of the institutional leaders, on the state of readiness of the faculty and staff regarding the topic and issues to be addressed, and on the size of the audience and facilities.

As a consultant, I am ready to teach the world round or flat depending upon the needs of the institution. I like to make speeches, lead workshops, moderate panels, interact in fishbowls, react to reports, serve as a provocateur, brainstorm, and make summary comments.

Although I have addressed many topics over the years, my current interest focuses almost exclusively on concepts and issues related to The Completion/Student Success Agenda and The Learning College.  We begin where the college is; sometimes helping more faculty and staff become aware of the issues and concepts is the priority; in other colleges the priority is to move the needle forward on initiatives well under way.

As you plan for my involvement with faculty and staff at your institution, I hope this experience will be part of an overall, strategic design to advance institutional goals. I believe deeply in the ideas I share, and when institutions are interested in these ideas and have created plans for their continuing development, I am much more satisfied about my contributions to the profession.

Following the opening ceremonies for the typical staff development day in which the president or another key leader usually sets the institutional context, I like to begin with an hour's speech. If the topic is the Completion Agenda, I usually suggest the title “Student Success Pathways to Completion.”  My speeches are always tailored to the specific needs and culture of the institution.

Following the presentation (and possibly a break) I find it helpful for a panel representing faculty, administrators, and support staff (if they are invited) to respond by sharing their ideas and issues and raising questions. I am perfectly willing to act as the outside expert and answer questions addressed to me, but participants take more responsibility and interest if they are asked to share their own perceptions, hopes, and concerns in a format in which we are all equally puzzling out how we can begin or sustain the institutional and personal journey to help our students become more successful. I always prod, applaud, respond, and raise more questions in such interactions with interested colleagues.

In the afternoon I often meet with a smaller group or groups—the college council, all the administrators, or the Committee on Student Success. The groups can be designed for faculty, administrators, support staff or for representatives from all employee groups—depending on the purpose and need.  In these group sessions I work with key staff from the college ahead of time to design a workshop format that will actively involve the participants in addressing issues, brainstorming alternatives, or recommending action.  Currently, a number of colleges have asked me to create a workshop design that engages cross-functional teams in reviewing my 6 Principles of the Completion Agenda to determine those that are priority for the college followed by participants agreeing on the most important practices and programs the college should explore and implement.

Please note that I am most willing to work in any program design that you create and to tailor my contributions to the specific needs of your institution. It will be very helpful if you send me information about your institution several months ahead of time. Reports, memos, and surveys on practices and programs related to the topic will be very useful. I hope these ideas will be helpful as you plan a day that we all want to be highly successful.

Terry O'Banion 2012
obanion@league.org
949-387-3690

References on request from the following:

I have spoken recently at a number of national and state conferences and at the Dallas County Community Colleges, Chaffey College (CA), Tidewater Community College (VA), Wallace Community College – Selma (AL), Santa Fe Community College (FL), The Community College of Southern Nevada, Germanna Community College (VA), Moraine Valley Community College (IL), Cleveland State University, Carl Sandburg College (IL), Grayson County College (TX), Long Beach City College (CA), Central Arizona College, and Kirkwood Community College (IA)

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WORKSHOP DESIGNS FOR THE STUDENT SUCCESS/COMPLETION AGENDA

Guidelines for Workshops

  1. Workshops are tailored for the priorities and culture of the college.
  2. Workshops are related to the theme of the opening presentation on student success and completion.
  3. Workshops are limited in what can be accomplished because of the brief amount of time involved and because of competing events in the day’s schedule.  Consider workshops as opportunities to introduce participants to possibilities and to experience the flavor of selected key ideas.
  4. Workshops are ideal for groups of 20 to 40 participants but can be designed for as few as 10 and as many as 100 or more.
  5. Basic designs include groups of 8 or so participants sitting around a table to interact on issues; 6 to 8 round tables in a comfortable room where everyone can hear is ideal.
  6. Colleges identify the groups to participate in the workshop.  Some groups for which workshops have been held include academic leaders, student service staff, student success committee, president’s cabinet, selected faculty, or support staff. Mixed groups of various staff can also work.
  7. Workshops can be designed for one hour to two hours; one and a half hours is often ideal depending on the schedule for the day’s event.
  8. Usually a facilitator and a recorder/reporter are required for each table.  The workshop facilitator will ask for volunteers unless the college wants to orchestrate a more structured plan and identify these leaders ahead of time.
  9. A projector all can see and a laptop are required to present workshop directions and to facilitate reports.
  10. Materials for duplication will be sent ahead of time.
  11. Colleges are urged to tie the outcomes of the workshop to continuing work.  Colleges should plan to collect lists of issues, recommendations, etc. that emerge in the workshop and follow up with the participants.
  12. Terry O'Banion can facilitate/orchestrate the workshops or members of the college staff may do so.

Workshop # 1—Institutional Conditions for Student Success
The purpose of this workshop is to assess the current level of selected conditions and to identify actions the college should take to improve the conditions.

Workshop Design:  Divide participants among tables and distribute one of the questions below to each table with the charge:

  1. To what extent is this condition a challenge at your college? Rate it on a 5 point scale from 1 = Low challenge to 5 = High challenge.
  2. What 3 actions should the college take to improve and implement the condition and to turn the rating into a 1 = low challenge?

Institutional Conditions to
Support Student Success and Completion

  1. A key leader or core of key leaders must champion the Completion Agenda and be able to rally a critical mass of faculty and staff to commit to the effort.
  1. There must be a collective “will” among college stakeholders strong enough to overcome the barriers and resistance that will emerge.
  1. College stakeholders must abandon organizational silos and partitions and engage with each other in a spirit of collaboration: Student success is everyone’s business.
  1. The college must be committed to a “Culture of Evidence” in philosophy and practice as a foundation for all decisions—to the extent it is possible.
  1. The college must partner with high schools and universities to create seamless student success pathways.
  1. College stakeholders should establish “High Expectations” for themselves and for students and clearly communicate these through policy, programs, and practice.
  1. Students must participate as full partners and must take primary responsibility for their own success.
  1. Professional development should be re-designed to focus on helping all members of the college community to achieve the skills and knowledge that will make these conditions come alive.

These conditions can be modified to better reflect the priorities of the college; some can be deleted; others can be added.

Workshop # 2—Principles for Student Success
The purpose of this workshop is to determine the actions the college should take to implement the principles.

Workshop Design:  Divide participants among tables and distribute one principle to each table with the assignment:  Agree on 5 key actions, programs, or practices the college should support to implement the principle.

Six Principles That Support Student Success

  1. Every student will make a significant connection with another person at the college as soon as possible.
  1. Key intake programs including orientation, assessment, advisement, and placement will be integrated and mandatory.
  1. Every student will be placed in a “Program of Study” from day one; undecided students will be placed in a mandatory “Program of Study” designed to help them decide.
  1. Every student will be carefully monitored throughout the first term to ensure successful progress; the college will make interventions immediately to keep students on track.
  1. All decisions regarding policies, programs, practices, processes, and personnel will be based on evidence to the extent it is possible to do so.
  1. Professional Development for all college stakeholders will focus on student success and completion as the highest priority.

These are the six principles that will be reviewed in the presentation.  Some principles can be deleted or modified.  Another variation is to assign groups the task of agreeing on the top 3 principles the college should support; additional principles to these six can be proposed and considered by participants to determine the top 3.  Once the entire group agrees on the top 3 principles each table is then asked to agree on the 5 key actions, programs, or practices the college should support to implement each of the top 3 principles.

Workshop # 3—Key Questions Related to Student Success
The purpose of this workshop is to identify 5 or 6 key questions deemed important by the college and to agree on actions.

Workshop Design:  Distribute one question to each table; directions are embedded in the question.  The following list of questions was used in August 2012 with about 75 managers at Long Beach City College in California:

  1. List at least 3 practices or actions the college can implement to ensure that every new student feels connected to someone at the earliest possible time they begin engaging the college.
  1. What are the 3 priority programs or practices LBCC should focus on in concert with area high schools to improve student success and completion?
  1. For students who are not ready for college credit courses, what are the 3 priority programs or practices LBCC should focus on to improve student skills and knowledge so they can be successful in college credit courses?
  1. To ensure that new students can successfully navigate the intake processes (admissions, assessment, orientation, advising, placement, financial aid, registration, etc.) so they are prepared to begin classes, what are the 3 priority programs or practices LBCC should make mandatory for all students?
  1. To ensure that students will be successful and not drop out of the first term in college, what are the 3 priority programs or practices LBCC should implement?
  1. List at least 5 significant milestones of student success appropriate to the culture of LBCC the college should establish to mark important achievements for students and for the college?
  1. For students who have made good progress and are beginning to plan for employment or transfer, what are the 3 priority programs or practices LBCC should provide these students to help them make a successful transition?

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