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In This Issue
 
September 2006, Volume 7, Number 9
 
 

Gatherings

  Innovations 2007
Call for Proposals
Extended to October 6, 2006!
  2006 Conference on Information Technology
  League Makes Donation to
LCTCS Hurricane Katrina Relief Fund

Opportunities

  Join the CCTI Network
  Subscribe to The New York Times and
Receive TimesSelect for Free
  TLT Group Offers Online Workshops
  Community College Leaders Use Appreciate Inquiry
in Collaborative Change Initiatives
  Uncovering the Heart of Higher Education
  Homeland Security Management Institute
Offers Bomb Threat Course for Schools
  Call for Manuscripts

Synergies

  New League Services Offerings Focus on
Using Humor for Positive Change
  Questionmark Releases White Paper:
“Using Online Assessments for Compliance”
  Calisphere Website Offers Free Access to
Thousands of Primary Sources
  Community College Research Center to Establish
Postsecondary Research Center
  Community College Baccalaureate Association
Becomes AACC Affiliate Council
  SchoolDude.com Announces Release of ITAMDirect

 

Linkages

  iStream: Focus on Accountability
  Getting Results Faculty Development Modules
Available Online and on CD
  Shop the League’s Online Store!
  Featured Publication:
Constructing Knowledge Through Reflection

Celebrations

  Member Spotlight: Volunteer State Community College

 
 
Break
 
 
League Connections keeps you in touch with the latest news and information from the League for
Innovation in the Community College. Sign up to receive this free monthly newsletter and other electronic
publications from the League at http://www.league.org/league/subscribe.cfm.

Deadline for submitting items for the October issue of League Connections is September 15, 2006
Click here to view the guidelines for submitting items to League Connections.
 
     
   
Gatherings Gatherings Gatherings
Gatherings
 

Innovations 2007
Call for Proposals
Extended to October 6, 2006!

http://www.league.org/i2007/
March 4-7, 2007
Hilton New Orleans Riverside
New Orleans, Louisiana
Hosted by
Louisiana Community and Technical College System

Innovations 2006The League for Innovation is accepting proposals to present at the Innovations 2007 conference, March 4-7, 2007, in New Orleans. After receiving a significant number of requests from individuals asking to submit proposals after the deadline date, the League has decided to extend the deadline for submission to Friday, October 6, 2006. Submit your proposal online at www.league.org/i2007/cfp/.

The Innovations 2007 conference will be held at the Hilton New Orleans Riverside, located on the banks of the Mississippi River, with easy access to everything New Orleans has to offer. This full-service luxury complex is actually a city within itself, providing shopping and entertainment options just steps away. The Riverwalk Marketplace (140+ shops and food outlets) is at the hotel's doorstep, as are Harrah's Casino, the Aquarium of the Americas, the IMAX Theatre, the French Quarter, the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center, the National D-Day Museum, the Arts District, the Louisiana Children's Museum, and the Riverfront Streetcar.

Innovations Streams. The Innovations conference incorporates ideas, initiatives, and inspirations from seven major streams into the broader conference goal of encouraging and facilitating student and organizational learning through innovation, experimentation, and institutional transformation:

  • Learning and Teaching
  • Leadership and Organization
  • Workforce Preparation and Development
  • Student Services and Activities
  • Basic Skills and Developmental Education
  • Resource Development and Foundation Management
  • Research, Assessment, and Accountability

Major Events and Opportunities at Innovations 2007

  • More than 2,000 participants exchanging the latest innovative practices in community colleges
  • Learning Center Courses on leading-edge topics granting continuing education units 
  • Extensive exhibition of educational resources and services from League Corporate Partners
  • Engaging keynotes, forums, special sessions, and poster sessions addressing critical issues facing community college educators
  • Roundtable discussions offering a more personal setting for exchanging ideas
  • Email and Internet Lab
  • The opportunity to exchange ideas with hundreds of colleagues during receptions, coffee and refreshment breaks, and after-hours gatherings

Hotel and Travel Information
Hotel and travel information is available at http://www.league.org/i2007/travel.htm.

For more information:
Mary Harris
Meeting Planner
480-705-8200, ext. 228
harris@league.org

We look forward to another great conference and hope you'll join us in New Orleans! Please share this information with others who may want to participate.

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2006 Conference on Information Technology

CIT logo October 22-25, 2006
http://www.league.org/2006cit
Charlotte Convention Center
Charlotte, North Carolina
Hosted by
Charlotte Regional Workforce Development Partnership

CIT is perfect for administrators, faculty, librarians, chief technology officers, webmasters, counselors and advisors, faculty development specialists, and others who care about exploring and expanding the use of information technology to improve all aspects of the educational enterprise.

You still have time to register prior to the conference and avoid increased onsite registration fees. Onsite registration fees go into effect October 21, 2006!

Confirmed Keynote Speakers

  • Honorable Sue Myrick, U.S. House of Representatives, North Carolina;
  • Ellen D. Wagner, Senior Director, Worldwide E-Learning Solutions, Adobe Systems;
  • Martin Bean, Managing Director, Worldwide Education Industry, Worldwide Public Sector, Microsoft Corporation;
  • Terri M. Manning, Associate Vice President, Institutional Research and Director, Center for Applied Research, Central Piedmont Community College.

Special Features at CIT

Selected Sessions. With more than 600 selected sessions as part of the conference program, novice educators and experienced professionals alike will find useful information and practical tips that will assist them in doing their job more effectively.

3D HoloProjection Demonstrations. Back by popular demand are demonstrations of 3D HoloProjection technology, a futuristic technology that creates more immersive and realistic learning experiences. If a picture is worth a thousand words, then the 3DH live demonstrations are worth millions!

Public Information Officer Summit. Marketing Communications for the 21st Century is scheduled from 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m., October 22, 2006. This half-day activity, especially designed for community college public information officers (PIOs) and held in conjunction with the 2006 CIT, focuses on the use of technology for marketing communication. This event provides an excellent opportunity rarely afforded PIOs to learn from each other by discussing issues important to their work. For additional information, contact Julie Haas at jhaas@jccc.edu.

ETS Symposium for College Leaders. Building a Culture of Evidence From the Ground Up will be held October 21-22. The symposium’s main focus is to help colleges create effective educational environments as new or expanded campuses are planned and built. Seating is limited. Fees are $250 per person, or $1,000 for a team of five, and include Saturday and Sunday breakfast and lunch, a Saturday evening reception, and exclusive access to an online network following the symposium.

Open-Source Solutions and Their Implications for Community Colleges. Presentations targeted toward this focus area should help community colleges evaluate, customize, anticipate, and position fiscally, technologically, and educationally sound open-source solutions to meet instructional and organizational needs.

More Than 100 Exhibitors. Cutting-edge companies and affiliated organizations serving community colleges provide conference participants with the opportunity to experience the latest products and services in an engaging, extensive, and impressive exhibition hall.

Charlotte, North Carolina. In Charlotte, there is always something new to entice, interest, and amaze. Charlotte's southern culture represents a colorful spectrum, from the fine artwork of the Mint Museum to the engine-racing thunder of NASCAR that draws more than a million visitors each year. Whether you stay a day, a weekend, or longer, Charlotte will keep you entertained!

Exhibiting at CIT. The 2006 CIT will continue the momentum and excitement generated by previous conferences by bringing an even greater number of participants to the alluring city of Charlotte. Companies that have exhibited at CIT in previous years know that space in the hall is limited and fills quickly. Be sure to secure your exhibition space early for the 2006 CIT! Direct any questions about exhibiting or about becoming a League Corporate Partner to Chris Hennessey at hennessey@league.org.

Hotel and Travel Information. Hotel and travel information is now available. For assistance or additional information, please visit www.league.org/2006cit, or contact Ed Leach at leach@league.org or (480) 705-8200, ext. 233.

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League Makes Donation to
LCTCS Hurricane Katrina Relief Fund

LCTCS presentationWhen Louisiana Community and Technical College System (LCTCS) staff, faculty, and administrators headed back to school for the 2006-2007 academic year, they were greeted with an $11,500 gift from the League for Innovation in the Community College and its members. The donation to the LCTCS Hurricane Katrina Relief Fund was generated by a portion of the proceeds from the League’s Innovations 2006 conference, originally scheduled for March 2006 in New Orleans, with LCTCS as the conference host.

After the damage and upheaval caused by Hurricane Katrina, the League was forced to relocate the 2006 conference, but did so only after assuring New Orleans and LCTCS that Innovations would return the following year. Keeping that commitment, the League’s 2007 Innovations conference is scheduled for March 4-7, 2007, at the Hilton Riverside in New Orleans. Louisiana Community and Technical College System is serving as conference host.

League President and CEO Gerardo E. de los Santos presented the donation to Walter Bumphus, President of the Louisiana Community and Technical College System, who accepted the gift on behalf of LCTCS. The presentation was made in New Orleans on August 13, 2006, during the LCTCS Conference and Leadership Development Day. De los Santos commented that “The League looks forward to being in New Orleans for Innovations 2007 to continue supporting our good friends and colleagues in Louisiana, and to help the world know that New Orleans and LCTCS are coming back stronger than ever.”

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Opportunities Gatherings Gatherings
Gatherings
 

Join the CCTI Network

CCTI

Join the CCTI Network today and attend the New Orleans Summit in March, 2007. The College and Career Transitions Initiative Site Partnership Teams throughout the United States have been working on tools and strategies to assist all colleges in successful transitions for their students. Community college-led teams and partnerships with high schools, employers, community-based organizations, universities, and others are working together to ease transitions and reduce remediation from high school to college to careers. If your college is working toward these types of goals, we invite you to join the CCTI Network and attend the CCTI Summit in New Orleans, March 2007.  For more information, go to http://www.league.org/ccti/networkapplication.

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Subscribe to The New York Times and
Receive TimesSelect for Free

NYTimesFaculty and students who subscribe to The New York Times can receive TimesSelect for free (a $24.95 value). TimesSelect provides complete access to nytimes.com, such as top op-ed and news columnists; access to archives up to 100 articles per month; enhanced multimedia, including podcasts and blogs; customized email alerts; preview of select articles in Sunday's Times; and a toolbar that help access, manage, and organize it all. For more information, please send an email to Jan Gilboy at gilboj@nytimes.com or call 1-888-443-1800.

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TLT Group Offers Online Workshops

TLT groupStudent Course Evaluations – From  Paper to Online: Issues, Questions, and Some Answers. This TLT Group online workshop is offered with lead cosponsor POD and is scheduled for Tuesdays, October 3, 10, and 17, 2006, from 4:00 to 5:00 p.m. EDT. Because POD is a lead cosponsor, members of POD who register get a special discount rate of $165 for this workshop. The workshop leaders are Michael Theall, Director for Center for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning (CATALYST), Youngstown State University, and Trav Johnson, BYU Faculty Center, Online Student Evaluation of Teaching in Higher Education (OnSET), Brigham Young University. To register for this workshop, click here.

The workshop will explore the following questions: What are the best practices for student course evaluation? Do they apply equally to classroom and online evaluations? What should we keep in mind in order to develop and sustain reliable, valid, useful, and accepted evaluation systems? Is one data-collection approach superior to the other? What are the characteristics and relative advantages and disadvantages of each? What are the critical institutional considerations beyond the mechanical question? How can evaluation data from both sources best be used?

Policy Issues for Blogs, Wikis, Newsfeeds, and Aggregators. This TLT Group online workshop is offered Tuesdays, October 3, 10, and 17, 2006, from 2:00 to 3:00 p.m. EDT, and the workshop leaders are Steve Gilbert, TLT Group; Lisa Star, TLT Group; and Laura Rediehs, St. Lawrence University. To register, click here.

The workshop will explore the following questions: Are blogs too trendy for higher education? How do blogs and other Web 2.0 technologies challenge traditional values of colleges and universities? How can an institution provide adequate oversight and support of blog activity, especially for the use of blogs that do not rely on institutionally controlled technology? Are the potential educational benefits of using blogs worth the trouble?   

All of the TLT Group’s online offerings include use of low-threshold tools, examination of controversial issues, options for participants with a range of experience, and suggestions for assessment as you integrate what you’ve learned into your repertoire. For information about how TLT events differ from most others you've attended, click here.   

Registration and pricing for individual participants. The price of registration for the workshop includes all three sessions, access to all resources, and access to the discussion forum. Click here to register as an individual. 

Workshop Pricing. The prices listed below are for single-participant registration. If you plan to register as a group, please see information about the group-pricing discount at http://www.tltgroup.org/Events/grouppricing.htm.

If you have any questions or comments, please contact Joanna Beiter, Online Program Coordinator, at beiter@tltgroup.org.

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Community College Leaders Use Appreciate Inquiry
in Collaborative Change Initiatives

AIFive hundred and forty-three community college leaders are bringing about collaboratively developed, strengths-based changes on their campuses. One of those 543 leaders, Zach Hodges, President at Houston Community College Northwest (TX), and a team of others at the college used Appreciative Inquiry (AI) at the college’s Spring 2004 convocation. In just half a day, more than 100 faculty and staff members (1) celebrated successes and had fun, (2) recognized excellence from the past and present that the college wanted to carry into the future, (3) discovered that positive questioning leads to positive change, and (4) reminded themselves of the power of the question so they could take this power into their classrooms and offices. The inquiry into the college's past and present strengths resulted in a collaboratively created vision statement for the college's preferred future, called a provocative proposition: "Unwavering in our quest for excellence, we who work and learn at Northwest College set high expectations for ourselves and each other, support each other's achievements, and make time to recognize and celebrate both individual and collective successes."

As a result of the inquiry, the college then used the fundamental elements of the provocative proposition - learning, serving, excelling - to report the state of the college at the fall 2004 convocation. Time was set aside for sharing and celebrating individual and group successes, progress, and accomplishments. The college also created a place on its portal for the ongoing sharing of success stories and began using a bumper-sticker version of the provocative proposition - Learning, Serving, Excelling: Northwest College, A Proud Community - as a graphical element in all official college communication.

Community college leaders, including trustees, CEOs, administrators, faculty, support staff, and students, can learn about the philosophy of AI and how to use AI processes to bring about positive change. Participate in one of the four-day Appreciative Inquiry Facilitator Training (AIFT©) workshops that are being held throughout the U.S.and Canada. For information about the AIFT and other programs and services for community colleges, go to http://companyofexperts.net and click on the Events Calendar.

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Uncovering the Heart of Higher Education

heartIn our densely interconnected world, integrative teaching and learning have never been more important. But in what components of their studies and in what dimensions of their persons are students being asked to make connections? We understand integration within a major, between fields, and even between knowledge and practice. More recently, the relationship between curricular and co-curricular activities has received attention. While these and other trends help students and faculty integrate otherwise fragmentary elements of their educational venture, do we go far enough? Do our efforts reach the often unspoken heart of higher education?

The central questions become, Do current higher education efforts address the whole human being - mind, heart, and spirit - in ways that contribute best to our future on this fragile planet? What steps can we take to make our community colleges, colleges, and universities places that awaken the deepest potential in students, faculty, and staff?

After two years of dialogue and planning, The Fetzer Institute and California Institute of Integral Studies are sponsoring a major conference in San Francisco on February 22–25, 2007, for the field of higher education. Uncovering the Heart of Higher Education will focus on integrative learning for compassionate action in an interconnected world. Conference partners include the Associated New American Colleges, Association of American Colleges and Universities, Council of Independent Colleges, League for Innovation in the Community College, and National Association of Student Personnel Administrators.

Targeted to faculty, administrators, student life professionals, and chaplains, the conference will address the relationships between curriculum and values; intellectual, aesthetic, and moral intelligences; technical competency and compassionate action; critical reasoning and contemplative inquiry; and vocation and life purpose. The rising interest in integrative learning supports a holistic approach to education that is founded on a growing recognition of the need for students to integrate their inner lives and their outer vocations. One aim of the conference is to draw together and articulate teaching perspectives from around the world that are theoretical, pedagogical, and relational. Tracks of inquiry will include contemplation, spirituality, and religion in higher education; integration of emotional and academic intelligence; cross-cultural competency, integrative learning communities, learning through work and service, leading from within, and the major trends in research.

With the rigor of traditional academic conferences, leading faculty, administrators, and student life professionals will present and explore best teaching practices as well as theoretical frameworks for programs, courses, and activities that will explore, promote, and cultivate a balanced education of heart, mind, and spirit, and a need to work in the world. At the same time, this conference will gather leading and diverse voices from across the country to share their journeys as educators.

Keynote speakers will include Pulitzer Prize-winning author Alice Walker; educational activist and author Parker Palmer; Pumla Gobodo-Madikizela of the University of Cape Town and author of A Human Being Died That Night; Robert Kegan, developmental psychologist at Harvard University and author of The Evolving Self; Eileen Wilson-Oyelaran, president of Kalamazoo College; Steve Mittelstet, president of Richland College; Diana Chapman Walsh, president of Wellesley College; Alexander and Helen Astin, co-directors of the Templeton Project on Spirituality in Higher Education. The conference includes five preconference institutes, 50 sessions, and four site visits in San Francisco.

Session leaders include Mirabai Bush, Arthur Chickering, Mary Taylor Huber, Pat Hutchings, Paul Elsner, Peter Laurence, Wayne Muller, Marilyn Nelson, Mary Rose O’Reilly, David Pollick, Ann Ponder, Laura Rendon, Elizabeth Ursic, Hal Roth, Jake Schrum, David Scott, Steve Severin, Patti Owen Smith, Beverly Tatum, and Arthur Zajonc.

Online registration begins this fall. For more information, visit http://www.heartofeducation.org or email Joseph Subbiondo, president of California Institute of Integral Studies, at heartofeducation@ciis.edu.

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Homeland Security Management Institute
Offers Bomb Threat Course for Schools

Monroe ccMonroe Community College’s Homeland Security Management Institute (HSMi) has created a new course designed to train teachers and school administrators how to deal with explosive threats.

Bomb Threat Management for Education Facilities will be held on Friday, Sept. 29, 2006, at the Public Safety Training Facility in Rochester, New York. Taught by local experts in bomb detection, disposal, and risk mitigation, the course focuses on developing a successful and realistic plan to deal with this threat.

“We recognize there is a need for more advanced training when it comes to preventing and reacting to bomb threats in schools. This course is really geared toward staff and administrators from the elementary, high school and even collegiate levels,” says HSMi Director John Perrone.

This hands-on course runs from 8:30 to 11:00 a.m. and is intended to teach essential staff how to effectively prepare and implement a bomb-threat plan for their educational institution. Chief discussion elements include developing and implementing a plan to deal with bomb threats, recognizing hazardous or suspicious devices, effective room searching techniques, and practical exercises on how best to handle threats received by telephone, internet, mail or other means. 

The course costs $29 per person, and attendance is limited to 30 individuals. Preference will be given to early registrants. To register, contact Sheila Manns at 585.753.3921, Fax 753.3785, or via email at smanns@monroecc.edu.

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Call for Manuscripts

League publicationsThe League maintains an open call for manuscripts for its monthly digital publications, Leadership Abstracts, Learning Abstracts, and Innovation Showcase. The editorial staff invites community college educators and scholars to share effective, innovative practices, processes, strategies, and programs with the field through the brief articles (1,500 to 2,000 words) featured in these publications. Click on the publication links below to access the guidelines for prospective authors:

Leadership Abstracts
Learning Abstracts
Innovation Showcase

If you have questions, please contact Cynthia Wilson at wilson@league.org or (480) 705-8200, ext. 238.

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Synergies Gatherings Gatherings
Gatherings
 

New League Services Offerings Focus on
Using Humor for Positive Change

League servicesHumor Helps You Thrive on Change. Avoid the burnout and stress of change. Humor helps you overcome the fear of failure, find balance, lighten up, loosen up, and experience joy. Learn to thrive in our turbulent times.

Serious FUN-damentals for Success. Put the positive power of humor to work to improve your health, motivation, relationships, communication, attitudes, and actions. These improvements will help you find success and may even force success to find you.

Inject Humor, Enhance Healing. Use humor’s therapeutic power to improve your health and happiness. It will supercharge your immune system, reduce pain, relax you, and empower you to truly live with purpose. Injecting humor can help heal you and help you heal others.

Teaming With Humor. Humor and play will enhance teamwork and team efficiency. Humor is a powerful relationship-building tool and is an essential part of effective team building. Learn to energize yourself and your team using the positive power of humor.

DeLIGHT DeCUSTOMER. Find balance with humor by learning to take yourself lightly while taking your job of serving the customer seriously. Humor is a powerful conflict resolution technique. Joy and profit result when you have fun delighting your customers.

Choice: Your Personal Power Tool. This seriously funny workshop shows you how to use the power of choice to manage, sell, teach, and serve people so everyone experiences the fun and joy of winning. The only person you can control is you, but you can influence others. Choosing humor as a response can positively and powerfully influence others.

Educators: Take Your Job and Love IT. Humor can energize the teaching and learning environment and help educators fall in love with their important work. Humor helps us reach them so we can teach them.

To have these new offerings and other topics delivered on your campus, contact Ed Leach at leach@league.org or (480) 705-8200, ext. 233.

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Questionmark Releases White Paper:
“Using Online Assessments for Compliance”

QuestionMarkThe need to demonstrate compliance has become a fact of life for organizations in all sectors. Assessments can be essential to a credible and defensible compliance strategy. Assessments help organizations document their effectiveness in delivering compliance training; they can also play a role in improving organizational performance.

Questionmark's white paper, “Using Online Assessments for Compliance,” describes how organizations can use assessments to demonstrate that their employees understand regulatory standards.

Compliance-related assessment applications include

  • Identifying knowledge gaps,
  • Measuring knowledge gained from compliance training,
  • Analyzing results in order to improve future training,
  • Documenting employees' mastery of required knowledge, and
  • Creating an effective and accurate audit trail.

Find out how your organization can improve its compliance programs through the effective use of assessments. Download a free copy of this Questionmark white paper at http://www.questionmark.com/us/whitepapers/index.htm.

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Calisphere Website Offers Free Access to
Thousands of Primary Sources

CalisphereUniversity of California officials recently joined State Superintendent of Public Instruction Jack O’Connell to announce the launch of the Calisphere website at http://www.calisphere.universityofcalifornia.edu. This free website offers educators, students, and the public access to more than 150,000 images, documents, and other primary source materials from the libraries and museums of the UC campuses and cultural heritage organizations across California.

Calisphere’s primary sources include photographs, documents, newspapers, political cartoons, works of art, diaries, transcribed oral histories, advertising, and other cultural artifacts that reveal the diverse history and culture of California and its role in national and world history. The site also provides a single entry point to more than 300 UC-created websites on a wide variety of subjects.

Especially for Educators. Calisphere makes it easy for educators to find images and documents aligned with the K-12 California Content Standards. “We know that learning is more exciting and teaching is more effective the closer a student can get to primary sources of information,” O’Connell said. “The Calisphere website is a remarkable learning tool that will provide students with a rich experience of California’s multicultural heritage. It puts the libraries and museums of the entire University of California system, along with rich historical resources from cultural heritage organizations, right at the fingertips of California students.”

These primary sources can be used by teachers in a variety of ways. A high school history teacher could quickly locate photos of the Black Panthers, UC Berkeley’s Free Speech Movement, or the Chicano Moratorium Committee to illustrate the social and political movements of the 1960s and 1970s. Or, a library media teacher could help a fourth-grade teacher find photographs and drawings of ethnically diverse miners and everyday people during the Gold Rush to demonstrate California’s early multicultural population.

Wyatt R. Hume, UC executive vice president and provost, noted that Calisphere’s “innovative approach emphasizing technology, unbounded access to educational and cultural resources, and partnerships with educators is a model for the future. In Calisphere, we see how the university can bring education to students wherever they are, whatever their needs, and whatever phase of life they are in.”

Images in Historical Context. Calisphere’s primary source sets also include overviews that provide historical context. The website also has the following special features:

  • Themed Collections. Primary source materials are organized into historical eras, from the Gold Rush to the 1970s, and aligned with California Content Standards for K-12 use.
  • California Cultures. California’s multicultural heritage is revealed through photographs and documents selected from UC’s libraries and special collections relating to African, Asian, Hispanic, and Native Americans. The collection also features teacher-created lesson plans. California Cultures was funded through an appropriation from the US Congress through the Library of Congress American Memory program.
  • Japanese-American Relocation Digital Archives. More than 10,000 personal and official images and documents bring educators inside the story of Japanese-American internment during World War II.

Calisphere is a public service project of the California Digital Library (http://www.cdlib.org). Through the use of technology and innovation, the CDL supports the assembly and creative use of scholarship for the UC libraries and the communities they serve.

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Community College Research Center to Establish
Postsecondary Research Center

CCRCThe Community College Research Center (CCRC) at Teachers College, Columbia University, in collaboration with partners at MDRC, the Curry School of Education at the University of Virginia (UVA), and professors at Harvard University and Princeton University, has been awarded a five-year grant of $9,813,619 from the Institute of Education Sciences of the U.S. Department of Education for a new center focused on studying the effects of programs designed to help students make the transition to college and master basic skills needed to advance to a degree.

The National Research and Development Center on Postsecondary Education will evaluate programs employed by two- and four-year institutions to reduce postsecondary education barriers and increase college completion rates.  “We are thrilled about this exciting new phase for CCRC and its partners, and gratified that it will allow us to continue to build on the work we have done so far. It is particularly noteworthy that the U.S. Department of Education has established a national research center on higher education with a very strong focus on community colleges. In the past, the large majority of research on higher education has focused on four-year institutions,” said Thomas Bailey, Director of CCRC, who will also serve as Director of the National Research Center.  

For millions of young people, weak academic preparation impedes access to, achievement in, and completion of higher education. Thomas Brock, MDRC Director of Young Adults and Postsecondary Education, said the grant would allow researchers to focus on this critical area in which too little rigorous research currently exists. “There is a gap in what we know and don’t know about the policies and programs that postsecondary institutions are implementing to improve student access and success in higher education,” said Brock. “This grant will give the center the opportunity to do the research that will help us say with more certainty what works and what doesn’t.”

CCRC and its partners will use the grant to evaluate the effectiveness of two programs: (1) those that enroll high school students in college courses; and (2) those that provide remediation groups or learning communities for low-skill students. Both evaluations will last over four years. The center will also evaluate financial aid policies and state incentives or sanctions to promote low-income, low-skilled students. Plans for other projects will be developed in close collaboration with the staff of the Institute for Education Sciences. “Given the millions of students who currently qualify as low skill or low income, the implications for these studies have far-reaching social and political impacts,” said Bailey.

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Community College Baccalaureate Association
Becomes AACC Affiliate Council

CCBAThe Community College Baccalaureate Association was established because the founders and members believe that an educated populace is the foundation of a free and prosperous society. They believe that the baccalaureate degree is an important entry requirement for better jobs and a better lifestyle, and their vision is that every person has an opportunity to pursue the baccalaureate degree at a place that is convenient, accessible, and affordable.

One of the missions of the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) is to connect other community college organizations with one another and with the broader mission of promoting student learning. For that reason, the Community College Baccalaureate Association has become an Affiliate Council of AACC.  

CCBA has formally and informally affiliated with several organizations that share the same vision of facilitating access to postsecondary education through community colleges. The League for Innovation, for example, has provided invaluable assistance in a number of ways for six years. The CCBA conference is a preconference of the League’s Innovations conference each year.

The National Association of Teacher Education Programs’ (NACCTEP) mission is to promote the community college role in the recruitment, preparation, retention, and renewal of diverse pre-K-12 teachers and to advance quality teacher education programs in the community college. NACCTEP and CCBA have been working together to provide a forum for those who are interested in the common interest of improved access to baccalaureate programs in teacher education. The CCBA annual conference opening reception is cohosted with NACCTEP.

The National Association for Community College Entrepreneurship (NACCE) recognizes that community colleges were ideally positioned to be catalysts for fostering economic vitality through entrepreneurship education at the community college level. They are interested in promoting access to entrepreneurship education in community colleges, including through baccalaureate programs.

Beth Hagan, the Executive Director of the Community College Baccalaureate Association has been working with a number of other community college organizations to foster dialogue and to promote interests common to those interested in access including the National Association of Colleges of Nursing and the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities.

For more information, visit the CCBA website at http://www.ACCBD.org or contact Beth Hagan at (239) 947-8085.

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SchoolDude.com Announces Release of ITAMDirect

SchoolDudeSchoolDude.com, the nation’s leading provider of web-native operations management solutions for educational institutions, has announced a revolutionary approach to information technology asset management (ITAM) in educational institutions with the release of ITAMDirect, a web-native system designed to gather and report information about networked hardware and software assets.

ITAMDirect supports all aspects of IT asset administration management for educational technology departments, ranging from monitoring and reporting to planning and life-cycle costing. The system delivers added value by fully integrating with SchoolDude’s ITDirect help desk management system to provide detailed configuration information and asset history for incident resolution. This streamlines the entire IT management process, reducing administrative burden and allowing for excellent record keeping and accountability for IT assets.

SchoolDude’s recent survey of educational technology professionals echoes the importance of effective IT asset management and the growing need for an efficient management solution. Nearly 80 percent of respondents indicated a need to more effectively track networked assets, and more than 84 percent believe automated data collection to be the most important feature of an ITAM solution. SchoolDude’s ITAMDirect system delivers these benefits to help educational technology professionals reduce the need for field audits of IT assets by 50 percent or more.

ITAMDirect tracks software licenses to ensure compliance and avoid penalties while monitoring usage to optimize license management, saving educational organizations up to 25 percent on license renewals. The system also manages installed software and identifies unauthorized software.

Further benefits of SchoolDude’s innovative asset management system include the ability to conduct proactive IT support management and better protect assets through improved security. Monitoring IT assets using SchoolDude’s system enables a technology department to look for certain problems before they occur. And by screening assets at the component level, ITAMDirect provides security by identifying missing or stolen assets through monitoring and reporting.

With more than 2,100 clients, SchoolDude is the nation’s leading provider of web-native operations management solutions designed exclusively for the needs of educational professionals. Backed by the industry’s only Legendary Service Program, SchoolDude’s broad suite of online applications is revolutionizing the business of managing educational operations. SchoolDude’s web-native tools for operations management offer easy-to-use, affordable solutions to help both small and large educational institutions save money, increase efficiency, and improve services. For more information about SchoolDude, visit http://www.schooldude.com.

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iStream: Focus on Accountability

iStream logoSubscribers to iStream have access to League conference keynote speeches and selected other sessions, League print and electronic publications, and a variety of other focused content for staff and organizational development. This month’s special focus is accountability, and the following list highlights special features and new content for September.

Thoughtful Topics. The Thunderducks of Richland College took their thunder values all the way to the top, winning the Malcolm Baldridge Award for Quality and Performance Excellence. President Steve Mittelstet describes the journey.

League Projects. El Centro College responded to a 1997 Texas education bill by learning how to weave evaluation into the fabric of institutional effectiveness. It worked, and it’s still working.

Partners. ACT, a provider of quality assessments for nearly 50 years, has a testing system that meets the individual needs of colleges everywhere.

The TLT Group Webinars, Dangerous Discussions, and Flashlight. This month, TLT began FridayLive!, a new interactive offering with a focus that will alternate between Clothing the Emperor and Quick-Low Threshold Applications (LTAs). Each month, the TLT Group offers a limited number of free seats to iStream subscribers.

Ten Questions to Leadership. Ronald L. Baker, Executive Vice President of the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities, is always eloquent. In this month’s Ten Questions to Leadership, he is also elegant in his discussion of assessment, accreditation, and the power of metaphor.

Education Pathways. Has George Lorenzo gone Bonk? You bet he has, bringing us technology professor Curtis Bonk’s rich and resourceful list of “Ten Forces That Flattened the Learning World.”

Log on to iStream for new content, new updates, and new ideas. For subscription information, visit http://istream.league.org or contact Wendy Neil, neil@league.org or (480) 705-8200 ext. 234.

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Getting Results Faculty Development Modules
Available Online and on CD

Getting results cdThe Getting Results multimedia professional development modules for training community college faculty, produced by WGBH-TV in association with the League, are available online at no cost (http://www.league.org/gettingresults), and a CD version is available for purchase through the League Store (http://www.leaguestore.org). The modules focus on the teaching of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, specifically in Advanced Technology Education classrooms. The videos accompanying the modules include real teachers and students in real classroom settings across the country, representing a range of fields, institutions, programs, and subject areas.

Suitable for self-study, face-to-face training, or other formats of online and onsite use, Getting Results gives faculty members strategies for deepening teaching and learning. Extensive curriculum is now available online at no charge at http://www.league.org/gettingresults. Free downloadable PDF versions of web-based text and PowerPoint outlines are included with each module. A CD-ROM version that does not require internet access is available for purchase ($29 price includes standard shipping) from the League Store at http://www.leaguestore.org.

Getting Results begins with an orientation video followed by six modules. Each module features classroom videos illustrating classroom practice; background information about the teacher and class; activities for learners; readings; downloadable, printable PDF versions of web-based text content; customizable PowerPoint slide shows; and suggestions on how to incorporate the strategies into users’ own classrooms. The module topics are

  • Creating a Community of Learners,
  • Planning for Outcomes,
  • Active Teaching and Learning,
  • Moving Beyond the Classroom,
  • Teaching with Technology, and
  • Assessing Teaching and Learning.

Funded by the National Science Foundation’s Advanced Technology Education (ATE) Program, Getting Results was produced by WGBH-TV, PBS’s flagship station, in association with the League for Innovation in the Community College. Getting Results draws on research about best practices in adult learning. It has been piloted at 13 community and technical colleges, and the Community College Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE) at The University of Texas at Austin is conducting a formative and summative evaluation through 2007.

WGBH Boston is America’s pre-eminent public broadcasting producer, the source of fully one-third of PBS's prime-time lineup, along with some of public television’s best-known lifestyle shows and children's programs and many public radio favorites. WGBH is the number-one producer of websites on pbs.org, one of the most trafficked dot-org websites in the world. WGBH is a pioneer in educational multimedia and in technologies and services that make media accessible to the 36 million Americans who rely on captioning or video descriptions. WGBH has been recognized with hundreds of honors: Emmys, Peabodys, duPont-Columbia Awards, and even two Oscars. In 2002, WGBH was honored with a special institutional Peabody Award for 50 years of excellence. For more information, visit http://www.wgbh.org.

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Shop the League’s Online Store!

League storeThe League’s newly revamped online store (http://www.leaguestore.org), with its user-friendly search feature, descriptions of available publications, and convenient credit card and purchase order options, offers new titles such as Knowledge Management in Practice: The Cuyahoga Community College Experience, and the ever-popular Cross Papers, as well as best-sellers such as Judith Boettcher and Rita-Marie Conrad’s Faculty Guide for Moving Teaching and Learning to the Web and Robert H. McCabe’s Yes We Can: A Community College Guide to Developing America’s Underprepared. The League Store also features CD versions of the LENs faculty development program (individual and institutional licenses are available) and the Getting Results online faculty development modules.

League publications focus on issues of particular interest to community college administrators, faculty, and staff, and frequently showcase effective practices and model programs in place at community colleges. For more information or to place an order, visit http://www.leaguestore.org.

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Featured Publication:
Constructing Knowledge Through Reflection

ReflectionIn this brief and engaging monograph, Anneliese Homan, the League's 2005-2006 Cross Papers Fellow, focuses on critical reflection and reflective thinking as tools for teaching and learning. Packing the book’s 40 pages with exemplary strategies for implementing critical reflection and reflective learning in the classroom, Homan also offers thoughtful analysis of relevant theory and research in her exploration of reflection as sound pedagogy. In addition to examples from a variety of disciplines, the monograph includes the author’s own template for evaluating student learning in reflection activities. Homan writes with elegance on a practical topic relevant to teaching and learning, thus maintaining the spirit and intent of The Cross Papers series. Constructing Knowledge Through Reflection is available for purchase through the League Store (http://www.leaguestore.org), and League Alliance institutions are eligible for a member discount.

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Member Spotlight: Volunteer State Community College

NewSkills Center at Volunteer State
Volunteer State Community College
Gallatin, Tennessee

Ronald Madden looks perplexed. He’s wading through an algebra text, the table in front of him strewn with scribbled equations. He runs his hand through his hair and then turns to Sheela Brachey, who’s sitting next to him.

“I don’t get this,” he says, sliding a page of scribbles over to her. She takes a moment to pick out the problem and then starts into an explanation. A minute later he’s back on track.

SpotlightIt doesn’t seem like an innovation in learning, but when you see that the room at Volunteer State Community College is packed with students and tutors, you can begin to understand the need. College administrators are facing a growing challenge: Many college students are simply not ready for college-level coursework.

The Southern Regional Education Board says the number of unprepared students is growing, estimating that 70 percent of students who enter college are not prepared. A recent ACT report shows reading skills declining among college-bound students. Only 51 percent of students taking the test last year were judged ready for college reading assignments. That’s the lowest level in more than a decade.

Educators say that without serious intervention, those students will wind up swamped and frustrated, and very often they will drop out of school. The NewSkills program at Volunteer State is designed to identify those students and give them the support they need, using high-tech assessment software, flexible skill development, and perhaps most importantly, a personal touch.

“Having that one on one helped me tremendously,” says Madden. “If you’re working on a computer lesson and you get stuck, you can just come out here and have someone walk you through it.”

Madden is a 41 year-old psychology major. He was a warehouse worker until an injury sidelined him. He wants to get a degree, but algebra was proving to be a big stumbling block.

“In high school I didn’t have to take algebra,” he says. “I need it now.”

Madden is an example of why the NewSkills program was started at Volunteer State in 1993. Educators found many adult students were arriving on campus without the basic math and English skills needed for the college-level work.

“Some adults are scared to death, because they haven’t seen an algebra problem in 20 years,” says NewSkills Director Kay Dayton.

The NewSkills program grew almost immediately to encompass a wide range of students from adults to first-time freshmen and even high school students. The teaching programs are made to be flexible in content and delivery. Students can work in the computer lab, or at home via the internet. They can have regular tutoring sessions or walk-in meetings. The work is also self-paced, so students can take as much time as they need without feeling rushed. It also allows students to move at quicker speeds, perhaps faster than a class would normally run. At each phase of the work, there are assessments to make sure it’s all sinking in.

The computer lab in the NewSkills Center consists of 25 work stations. On many days, the room is full. But the busiest room is next door, where tutors work with students one on one. “What makes this work are the people. You can have wonderful technology, but if you don’t have that caring person, it won’t work,” says Dayton. “One former director called it heart and soul, a combination of high tech and the personal touch.”

Back at NewSkills, the afternoon moves on, and tutoring is happening all over the room. The tables are filled, so staff members are helping students while standing next to filing cabinets and fax machines. There is the soft murmur of questions and explanations in the air and the rustling of paper.

Yolanda Bailey is working on algebra. Her tutor listens to the question and then pauses for a moment before putting her pencil to the paper to map out an equation.

“When it works with a student,” says tutor Sharon Holland-Maleby, “you can see that light bulb go on. It’s really fulfilling.”

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League Connections is published monthly by the League for Innovation in the Community College.
For information, contact Cynthia Wilson.

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