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March 17-20, 2002
Boston Marriott Copley Place

For more information contact
Gerardo E. de los Santos
(480) 705·8200 x222

Hosted by:
Bunker Hill
Community College

 


Learning Center Courses

The Learning Center features intensive courses and workshops on some of the latest innovations and best practices used in community colleges. Participants receive a continuing education unit (CEU) for completing each course and can expect to take home a body of practical knowledge and applications. Participation in Learning Center Courses requires an additional registration fee
of $100 per 3-hour course and $150 per 6-hour course.

Seating is limited, so be sure to register early!

 

6-HOUR LEARNING CENTER COURSE (1 DAY/6 HOURS)
Sunday, March 17
9:00 a.m.—12:00 noon, 1:00–4:00 p.m.

Leadership and Organization

1. The Community College Orientation Course


The Community College Orientation Course offers newcomers a solid grounding in the important fundamentals as well as an exploration of the intriguing future directions of the community college. Participants will engage in a full-day learning experience with community college leaders and colleagues from around the world. Community colleges are profoundly distinctive educational institutions, steeped in linkages to their communities and democratic ideals. They have grown into a major force in society and continue to evolve and expand in response to changing social and economic needs. Now, as community colleges face waves of retirements and new workforce demands, they are challenged to help increasing numbers of new faculty, administrators, and staff understand and appreciate the history, culture, and potential of this extraordinary educational environment. If you're looking for a program to help newcomers quickly get up-to-speed with community college culture and cutting-edge models for teaching and reaching students, the Community College Orientation Course is the one.

Mark David Milliron, President and Chief Executive Officer; Cindy L. Miles, Vice President and Senior Program Officer, League for Innovation in the Community College, AZ

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Resource Development and Foundation Management

2. Presidential Seminar: Leading Institutional Advancement


Community Colleges increasingly rely on private support to offset declining state appropriations and ensure that their programs and students achieve the levels of excellence necessary in today’s competitive markets. The Council for Advancement and Support of Education has developed the Presidential Seminar: Leading Institutional Advancement expressly for community college CEOs. The seminar provides community college leaders with the opportunity to share strategies and information on institutional advancement and learn from some of their most successful peers. Community college presidents, foundation directors, and other senior professionals will lead discussions on the following topics: "The Philanthropic Landscape: Private Support of Community Colleges," "Leadership in Context: Governance Structures and Management Strategies for Successful Institutional Advancement," Fundraising Fieldwork: Donor Cultivation and Solicitation," and "The Home Front: Integrating Advancement with Other Leadership Functions."

David Bass, Director, National Center for Institutionally Related Foundations, Council for Advancement and Support of Education, D.C

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Learning and Teaching

3. The Seed of True Self: Living and Working with Integrity

This experiential Learning Center Course explores formation as designed by Parker J. Palmer, the author of The Courage to Teach. Palmer describes formation as "journeying, individually and in community, to our inner selves, our hearts and souls, to identify our true selves and our deep integrity." Participants actively learn the touchstones of formation through stories, poetry, and journals, in large and small groups, and in solitude. Specifically, stories from "our own lives" are shared, as well as those from various wisdom traditions to explore identity and integrity. And for those interested in deepening their learning about formation, participants will receive literature describing the newly created national Center for Formation in the Community College.

Ann Faulkner, Co-director; Sue Jones, Co-director, Center for Formation in the Community College, TX

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3-HOUR LEARNING CENTER COURSES (1 DAY/3 HOURS)
Sunday, March 17
1:00–4:00 p.m.

Workforce Preparation and Development

Register Now!

4. There’s Still an IT Gap: How Microsoft is Working with Community Colleges to Close It!

In a quickly changing IT job market, where are the IT jobs in demand, what are the skill sets required to fill these jobs? In this Learning Center Course, participants learn how to prepare students for lucrative IT careers by building a curriculum path based on Microsoft’s newly announced certifications. Participants also learn how to identify the extensive resources available to community colleges including courseware, software, curriculum roadmaps, technical support and early access to technology breakthroughs through alliances with Microsoft. Experienced educators share ideas about how to work with local businesses in getting hands-on work experiences and internships for students. This session will particularly benefit individuals responsible for IT workforce development.

Diana Carew, Program Manager;
Janie Schwark, Lead Marketing Manager,
William Setten, Educational Publishing,
Microsoft Corporation, WA

 

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Monday, March 18
1:15–4:15 p.m.

Learning and Teaching

5. How the Brain Learns: Research, Theory, and Classroom Application

The brain has a natural learning process and an innate need and desire to learn. When we know how the brain learns, we can help students be the naturally motivated, successful learners they were born to be. This session will particularly benefit those individuals who are interested in the most recent brain research and theory, how to apply this knowledge in their classrooms, and methods for creating and teaching brain-compatible curriculum.

Rita Smilkstein, Professor Emerita, Humanities, North Seattle Community College, WA

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Monday, March 18
1:15–4:15 p.m.

Leadership and Organization

6. Putting the Learning College Principles to Work

Through interaction with participants in the League’s Learning College Project, learners in this course explore ways in which leading institutions are implementing the Six Principles of the Learning College identified by Terry O’Banion: The Learning College (1) creates substantive change in individual learners; (2) engages learners in the learning process as full partners with primary responsibility for their own choices; (3) creates and offers as many options for learning as possible; (4) assists learners to form and participate in collaborative learning activities; (5) defines the roles of learning facilitators in response to the needs of learners; and (6) succeeds only when improved and expanded learning can be documented for learners. In this course, learners assess the extent to which their colleges are
applying these principles and identify obstacles and challenges their colleges face on the journey toward becoming more learning centered. Learners then explore strategies to overcome these barriers.


Cynthia Wilson, Vice President, Publications & Research, League for Innovation in the Community College

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Monday, March 18
1:15–4:15 p.m.

Student Services and Activities

Register Now!

7. A Comprehensive Faculty Advisor Professional Development Series: Enriching Advisement Through the Workshop Series

Don’t miss the opportunity to learn about the most comprehensive faculty advisor series in the nation. This series, a result of collaborative efforts by the Student Services and Academic Services divisions at Monroe Community College, is designed to provide faculty and staff the opportunity to develop and enhance their advising skills. A strength of the program is that it is offered at three key skill levels—basic, intermediate, and advanced. The breadth of workshops encompasses the broad spectrum of basic advising techniques, to developmental advising strategies. Through this interactive display of a unique and creative 23 workshop series, learn why this program has become a significant vehicle for faculty and staff professional development.

Susan Baker, Assistant Vice President, Student Services; Denise Klein, Senior Advisor, Counseling and Testing, Monroe Community College, NY

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Monday, March 18
1:15–4:15 p.m.

Workforce Preparation and Development

8. Building a World Class Workforce by Delivering World Class Programs

The competitive nature of globalization is increasing the need for high quality work processes and products. Georgia educational, economic development, and business and industry leaders have long recognized the need for a world class workforce and have since developed world class training programs in manufacturing, customer service, and warehousing and distribution through the use of skill standards to meet these needs. In 2001, the National Skill Standards Board began working with the State of Georgia Technical College System as a first step toward implementing the MSSC Skill Standards for core manufacturing. This partnership will serve as a national model for the implementation of core manufacturing skill standards in other states. Participants of the session learn how to begin partnerships as well as develop and evaluate programming including a "how to do" kit. This session should particularly benefit states that are moving towards skill-based standards and implementation of National Skill Standards Board and MSSC certifications.

Pam Griffin, Director Economic Development Programs;
Jackie Rohosky; Assistant Commissioner, Economic Development Programs, Georgia Department of Technical and Adult Education, GA;
Edie West, Executive Director, National Skill Standards Board, D.C.

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Tuesday, March 19
1:15–4:15 p.m.

Learning and Teaching

9. Focus on Learning: Student Outcomes Assessment in the Community College

Colleges across the country are faced with the challenge of designing and implementing meaningful learning centered student assessment programs. This session describes how Mesa Community College has established a model for student assessment that is founded on good practice, resulting in a more learning centered academic culture. Don’t miss this opportunity to learn how to plan and implement a successful insitution-wide program to assess student learning by engaging in active learning activities including: self-evaluating their own college's assessment efforts in light of the principles; identifying key players, roles, and responsibilities for assessment at their college; planning a framework for developing and implementing a program appropriate to the environment at their college; and using assessment results to improve student learning. This Learning Center Course will
particularly benefit administrators and faculty members leading assessment initiatives.

Andrea Greene, Director, Office of Research and Planning;
Gail Mee, Dean, Instruction;
Jeffrey Andelora, Chair, English, Mesa Community College, AZ

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Tuesday, March 19
1:15–4:15 p.m.

Leadership and Organization

10. Assuring that "Community" Is More than Just Our Middle Name


"Community" is a spirit and attitude to be engendered at our colleges. This interactive Learning Center Course provides participants with many innovative ideas that are successful at Foothill College. Participants also have the opportunity to share their own "best practices" with one another. This is the perfect environment for campus "change agents" from all levels to use the CASE Method—Copy And Steal Everything! Participants learn about more than 50 proven ideas that will help enhance and strengthen their college community.

Mike McHargue, Counselor/Professor;
Bernadine Fong, President, Foothill College, CA

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Tuesday, March 19
1:15–4:15 p.m.

Leadership and Organization

11. Success Marketing Strategies for Developmental Learning Programs


As community colleges embrace the learning college philosophy, they also confront a demanding learning college expectation: significant student learning outcomes that can be documented. Presenters demonstrate successful strategies to capture, organize, and market program information by describing how to effectively merge demographic data, historical records, student success stories, and other relevant material to create several powerful media presentations that document learning outcomes. Learn how to make your developmental learning program a "star" at your college by promoting program success, validating program development initiatives, and demonstrating
program accountability.

Barbara Bollmann, Vice President, Learning/Instruction;
Karla Bohman, Basic Skills Curriculum Specialist;
Larry Kerr, Instructional Design Specialist, San Juan College, NM

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Tuesday, March 19
1:15–4:15 p.m.

Resource Development and Foundation Management

12. Funding Your Field of Dreams

We do GOOD work! At our community colleges, we truly are the potential to positively influence the lives of our students and the communities they represent. We all have brilliant ideas—ideas that address critical community needs. What would our program be like if all of our dreams could come true? In this interactive pre-conference session, we explore the world of resource development, examining the process of successful proposal development. Participants learn how to locate funding sources, work collaboratively on proposal
development, understand the critical elements of a successful proposal, and finally to pull it all together to submit a fundable proposal. Bring a copy of a proposal or a concept paper for review to get the most out of this hands-on workshop.

Lyvier Conss, Executive Director;
Joseph Swaba, Grant Coordinator, Campus Compact National Center for Community Colleges, AZ

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