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Live Special Sessions Webcasts!

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Session Titles

Biotechnology Special
Session

Wireless Internet Information

Nanotechnology: Possible Directions for Educators



November 17-20
Long Beach Convention Center
Long Beach, CA

For more information contact
Ed Leach (480) 705·8200 x233

Hosted by:
Los Angeles
Community College District

Long Beach City College District

Future Conference Dates:

October 19-22, 2003
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Hosted By:
Wisconsin Technical
College System

November 7-10, 2004
Tampa, Florida

Learning Center Courses

The Learning Center features intensive courses and workshops on some of the latest innovations and best practices used in higher education. Participants receive continuing education units (CEUs) for completing each course and can expect to take home a body of practical knowledge and applications. Participation in Learning Center Courses requires an additional registration fee of, except where noted, $100 per 3-hour course or $150 per 6-hour course.

Courses held in computer labs are represented by the following icon:  

 

Full-Day Learning Center Course
$150 per course
(except where noted)

 
Sunday November 17, 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Register now!

The Sedona Edge at the Conference on Information Technology
Paul Elsner, Monica Manning, and Mark Milliron welcome participants to an experience based on the hugely successful Sedona Conferences (www.paulelsner.com). In this session, participants discuss how the convergence of media, education, technology, and entertainment has not only changed the technology landscape, but also our cognition, our engagement of youth, our artistic challenges, and how we view a more global community. Paul capstones and showcases the best of the recent Sedona and Barcelona conferences' emphasis on creativity and thinking and leads a discussion about why these are our most fundamental and essential edge. Monica and Mark reengage their ongoing conversations about how many of us are searching for balance in this fast-paced digital world. Paul closes the session by facilitating a dialogue about violence and civility in the academy. Come join colleagues in dynamic and thoughtful conversations about convergence, divergence, and resurgence in our everyday work.

Paul Elsner, Chancellor Emeritus, Maricopa Community College District, AZ; Monica Manning, Executive Officer, The Nova Group, MN; Mark David Milliron, President and CEO, League for Innovation in the Community College, AZ

 
Sunday November 17, 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Chief Information Officers Summit

This summit is a must-do event for technology leaders and interested college administrators. Chief Information Officers from around the world discuss effective strategies, investigate important issues, and review model programs pertaining to community college information technology and infrastructure. The summit’s experienced facilitators share creative approaches to issues facing technology leaders, including hot topics such as marking information technology as a solution to budget woes (e.g., cleverly reducing your budget, maintaining and securing new staff, doing the right things with a tight budget); emerging technologies (e.g., SAN and NAS, wireless solutions); and website redesign (e.g, who needs to be involved, timeline, what features are most important). Course participants also have an opportunity to break into small groups for peer-related topical discussions concerning ERP systems and e-learning (course management systems) issues. We invite you to join colleagues from around the world in this annual event aimed at creating a strong network of community college CIOs committed to improving the IT systems of today while continuing to set a vision for tomorrow.
Doug Allen, Executive Director, Information Services, Johnson County Community College, KS; Todd Jorns, Senior Director, Instructional Technology; Illinois Community College Board, IL; Ann Strine, Assistant Vice Chancellor, Information
Technology, Pima County Community College District, AZ
Lunch sponsored by
 
Sunday November 17, 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
LTAs for Cost-Effective Improvement of Teaching, Learning, and Professional Development
This workshop introduces faculty leaders and academic support professionals to easy-to-use, cost-effective instructional applications of information technologies called Low Threshold Applications (LTAs) and to Low Threshold Uses (LTUs) that rely on these applications. LTAs can be used to (1) help faculty with course management (Timesavers), (2) increase connectedness among faculty and students (Connectors), (3) support personalization of teaching and learning (Personalizers), and for other important educational purposes. Workshop participants experience how these resources can be found, collected, adapted, and used locally as important elements of their institution's professional development services. Participants also learn techniques for collaborating more effectively with academic support professionals, faculty leaders, and academic administrators beyond their own campuses. For more info about LTAs, see http://www.tltgroup.org/LTAs/Overview.htm.
Steven Gilbert, President, TLT Group, Washington, DC
 
Sunday November 17, 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

WomenTech: Strategies that Work for Recruiting and Retaining Female Students in IT Programs
Learn directly from the nation's leading expert on preparing women for technology careers. During this fast-paced interactive workshop, information technology instructors, school-to-career coordinators, and college administrators learn how to develop a plan that can be put to use right away for recruiting and retaining women for traditionally male-dominated courses and school-to-work activities. Participants experience a combination of interactive videos, case studies, role playing, and short lecture presentations in an exciting and extremely informative session. And since the bulk of the workshop is group work, there's also ample opportunity to interact with and learn from others in the field.
Donna Milgram, Executive Director, Institute for Women in Trades, Technology and Science, CA

 
Sunday November 17, 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

World Organization of Webmasters Certified Apprentice Webmaster ($600)
The World Organization of Webmasters (WOW) has designed guidelines, learning objectives, and resources as a foundation for pursuing knowledge, experience, and/or careers as a Web professional. Participants in this intensive one-day course review the relevant knowledge and skills that a WOW-Certified Apprentice Webmaster (CAW) possesses. This course covers and certifies essential competencies for aspiring or practicing Webmasters, including Internet basics, HTML, Web graphics, Web multimedia, website design, website management, Web project management, Web marketing, Web accessibility, and basic Web-related legal issues. After completing this Learning Center Course, individuals can take the WOW CAW Certification Exam. The intent is to certify individuals in a body of knowledge derived from worldwide job task analysis that has been validated through a survey of hundreds of Web professionals and accepted as the baseline job requirements for any Webmaster. Gain a deeper perspective of Webmaster issues, discover what skills and knowledge are covered on the certification exam, obtain a great intensive overview of technical Web topics, and get certified to improve your career options. NOTE: This course is geared toward the Web professional who is familiar with most, if not all, of the course material. For those individuals who need preparation for the WOW Certified Apprentice Webmaster (CAW) exam prior to the conference, please visit:
http://www.joinwow.org/wci/cawoverview.asp
Jan Heck, Senior Instructor; Michelle Wild, Senior Instructor, World Organization of Webmasters, CA

 
Sunday November 17, 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

WHAT Roadblocks? You CAN Shape the Dream!
You want to offer comprehensive Internet-based instructional programs and support services that reach out to diverse student populations through the use of technology. You want to equip your students with the learning outcomes necessary to meet the challenges of the 21st century. You want to develop innovative technology-mediated learning environments that encourage student success and energize your faculty and staff. Yet you may have inadequate resources, insufficient funding, resistant administrators, skeptical faculty, under-prepared students, unreliable technology, limited technical support, and an unclear vision for the future. Learn how effective leadership-by-example, a can-be-done attitude, and collaboration in decision making across divisions and ranks can make things happen. Foothill College has taken the next leap in Internet-based learning, offering over 200 online, hybrid, and Web-enhanced courses and five online Associate of Arts degrees, reaching over 7,500 students through its own online learning management system. In this workshop style course, participants work in groups to identify common roadblocks, learn from each other's successes/failures, and leave the session prepared to shape a vision for the future and to collaborate on creating the learning environment of the new millennium that focuses on deep learning.
Bernadine Chuck Fong, President; Vivian Sinou, Dean, Distance and Mediated Learning, Foothill College, CA; Mike McHargue, Staff Development Coordinator, Foothill College, CA

 
Sunday November 17, 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Implementing Activity-Based Learning and Authentic Assessment Into Your Courses
Participants in this session learn specific ways to implement activity-based learning and authentic assessment using proven curriculum development architecture. Experience hands-on exercises that help you recognize firsthand some of the frustrations of traditional lectures and evaluations. This session should particularly benefit educators who are interested in implementing activity-based learning into their courses. Discussion of activity-based, competency-based, and industry-verified curriculum modules clarifies the advantage of this innovative approach to teaching and learning.
Monica Pfarr, Director, AIM Center, Sinclair Community College, OH; Shep Anderson, Associate Professor, Industrial Engineering Technology, Sinclair Community College, OH

 
Sunday November 17, 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Cyber Security Fundamentals: Underground Hacker Secrets Exposed ($295)
This Learning Center Course provides participants access to the little-known world of the hacker underground and provides them with hard to find fundamentals about how hackers hack. Understanding how basic protection of information against unauthorized disclosure, transfer, modification, or destruction, whether accidental or intentional, helps individuals understand basic computer security threats. The presenter provides demonstrations of actual methods and hacking techniques and examines many of the publicly available free tools used by today’s most notorious hackers. The presenter also discusses several of the most commonly used exploits and provides strategies for defending your IT systems against them. This course is designed for anyone interested in improving network security or securing their personal computer system and its data from cyber attacks. This course is also valuable for educators considering developing cyber security curriculum for their institution.

Participants in this Learning Center Course also have the opportunity to continue in WOW's outstanding eight week online introductory course that provides an understanding of current and future technology vulnerabilities found on the Internet, local area networks, servers, and workstations. Please click here for additional information.
Monte Paden, Instructor/WOW Certified Professional Webmaster, CIS, West Hills College, CA

 

Morning Learning Center Courses
$100 per course

 
Sunday, November 17, 8:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

Register now!

Say It Isn't So: Plagiarism in the Digital Age
Participants in this interactive, hands-on session explore the prevalence of plagiarism in academia and learn ways in which modern technology can be used to commit and deter plagiarism. Strategies for preventing plagiarism, such as designing effective assignments, as well as strategies for detecting plagiarism, such as using free and commercial detection services, will be examined. Real-life examples are used, including opportunities to identify problem assignments that might trigger student plagiarism, guidelines for providing assignments that reduce the likelihood of plagiarism, and a comparison of plagiarism detection services. This session will benefit anyone involved in assigning and grading students’ written work, as well as those educators involved in enforcing academic honesty policies.
Carla Levesque, Librarian; Melisandre Hilliker, Head Librarian, St. Petersburg College, FL

 
Sunday, November 17, 8:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.  

Register now!

Develop Your Web Toolkit: Attitude, Macromedia Software, and Proven Results
Participants of this Learning Center Course receive considerable hands-on experience with Macromedia Dreamweaver, Fireworks, and Flash, with additional references to other audiovisual and 3D software. This course not only answers the question, What are these tools? but also, When do I use them? The focus is on effective educational applications, not on using software for its own sake. Tutorials for use before and after the session are provided on a supporting website. An impressive variety of models for effective Web-enhanced learning are reviewed, including student projects, interdepartmental collaborations, learning communities, hybrid courses, and faculty-developed learning interactions. The presenters also provide practical, proven motivational approaches to nurture personal and institutional change toward more effective uses of technology for instruction.
Eric Kraus, Assistant Professor, Developmental Studies; William Struhar, Professor, Psychology, Sinclair Community College, OH

 
Sunday, November 17, 8:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

Register now!

Designing and Implementing a Multicampus, Multiphase Comprehensive Technology Plan
This presentation showcases San Jacinto College's (SJC) three-phased technology-planning process designed to identify and address the gap between the current level of technology available to users and their technology needs. Participants learn the processes of implementing planning committees, prioritizing recommendations, identifying funding, and executing the plan. Included are guidelines for determining the capability of local technology personnel to support districtwide technology initiatives. This session should particularly benefit individuals interested in discussing the challenges of successfully planning for and implementing technology on their campuses. Participants receive a CD-ROM containing the SJC technology plan, as well as sample planning documents and forms. Following the conference, participants are able to access a course website to interact with presenters and other participants through synchronous and asynchronous discussions.
James Horton, Chancellor; Bill Lindemann, Vice Chancellor, Instructional Programs and Services; Niki Whiteside, Director, Educational Technology Services; Catherine O'Brien, Curriculum Facilitator; Sue Rodgers, Coordinator, Technology Learning Center, San Jacinto College, TX

 
Sunday, November 17, 8:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.  

Register now!

Technology in the Learning College
This Learning Center Course begins with a panel of representatives from colleges participating in the League’s Learning College Project sharing, through demonstration and discussion, successful practices their colleges have implemented for using technology to become more learning centered. The course continues with an exploration of issues, obstacles, and challenges – identified by course participants – in using technology to improve and expand learning. Prior to the conference, course participants will be asked to submit questions or scenarios dealing with current or anticipated issues, obstacles, and challenges associated with technology in the Learning College. Questions may relate to any area of the college in which technology is used to support learning (e.g., the use of technology in learning and teaching, in professional development, in student services and support, or in administrative services and support). During the course, small groups made up of panelists and participants draw on their experience and knowledge to address the questions. Course participants leave with a set of successful practices from Vanguard Learning Colleges, as well as ideas for dealing with issues, obstacles, and challenges they and their colleges may face on the journey toward becoming more learning centered.
Cynthia Wilson, Vice President, Publications and Research; Cindy L. Miles, Vice President, Learning and Academic Affairs, Community College of Denver, CO

 
Sunday, November 17, 8:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.  

Register now!

Building Your Classroom Website
A classroom website is an effective method of distributing course information such as a syllabus, reading lists, and handouts, as well as a valuable portal for collaborative communication through chat rooms and bulletin boards. Participants in this exceptionally interactive and hands-on Learning Center Course learn concepts and techniques for planning, designing, and developing a companion website for traditional face-to-face courses. The session begins with a demonstration of a classroom website, followed by participants working in small groups to design their own websites. The course concludes with the presenter introducing participants to tools used to develop websites. Course participants leave the presentation with their own working website and the knowledge necessary to maintain and update it.
James J. Taggart, Assistant Professor, Computer Information Systems, Atlantic Cape Community College, NJ

 
Sunday, November 17, 8:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.  

Register now!

Strategies for Retaining Online Students: An Interactive Short Course
Reported online retention rates are wide-ranging, as are the means for justifying these rates. One reason for these variances is the limited amount of empirical data gathered from non-persisting students. Monroe Community College (MCC) has gathered and analyzed data from these learners and has implemented new retention strategies and processes for online students as a result of these efforts. This session will benefit individuals who teach, support, or oversee online course delivery and who want to learn how to use retention data to inform course design and refine faculty course development training sessions. Course participants learn about the MCC study findings, observe and discuss online courses that use specific retention strategies, and design their own online activity using the retention concepts presented.
Jeffrey Bartkovich, Vice President, Educational Technology; Marie Fetzner, Assistant to the Vice President, Susan Belair, Assistant Professor, Sociology, Monroe Community College, NY

 
Sunday, November 17, 8:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.  

Register now!

Beyond Facilitation
Many instructors have been teaching online long enough to know that basic facilitation skills can help them get started, but aren't enough to sustain an online course. Instructors often note that they have the basic online facilitation skills that allow them to get a course started, but once the course is underway, it takes more than content to keep it going. This course focuses on the advanced skills needed to sustain good participation and interactivity throughout the course while also building a solid learning community. This session is a combination of presentation, discussion, and small group work, and participants are encouraged to relate to the information provided based on their experiences with online teaching and to brainstorm solutions to online teaching problems.
Rena Palloff, Faculty, School of Education; Keith Pratt, Faculty, The Fielding Graduate Institute, Capella University, CA

 

Afternoon Learning Center Courses
$100 per course

 
Sunday, November 17, 1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Register now!

Learning About Learning Objects with Learning Objects
This session defines learning objects and provides participants with the opportunity to see, hear, and interact with learning objects created with Flash, Director, Shockwave, streaming media, and interactive databases for a variety of subjects. Participants learn how to design learning objects; find appropriate content in learning object repositories; and discuss issues related to research, accessibility, and housing learning objects for online delivery. Instructors, instructional technologists, and course designers are encouraged to attend this very interactive hands-on session.
Sandy Mills, CEO; Alfredo Ignacio, Director, Development, AliveTek, Inc., FL

 
Sunday, November 17, 1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. 

Register now!

From Assignment to e-Portfolio: Assessment in Action
This lab-based Learning Center Course begins with a discussion about using e-portfolios for assessment, after which course participants review examples of student work assessed and presented in e-portfolios. Participants then work in teams to complete an assignment with specific objectives, assess the assignment through self-reflection on the learning, and exhibit their learning in e-portfolios. This session will greatly benefit participants who understand authentic assessment and want to provide their students with opportunities to best demonstrate their competencies in dynamic new ways to instructors, peers, and potential employers.
Peggy Moe, Associate Dean, Professional and Technical Education; David Ortiz, Founding Faculty, Communications, Cascadia Community College, WA

 
Sunday, November 17, 1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. 

Register now!

Accessibility: The New Y2K
Who needs accessible websites? Students, faculty, staff, and the general public do. Access to Web-based information offers several significant advantages as more and more services and information are delivered via the Web. But design and coding practices can often block access to people with disabilities. The Pasadena City College Web Team, working with a leading accessibility consultant, built a new fully-accessible Web environment. Learn how to design and make available Web materials that meet Federal Web Content Accessibility Guidelines. This session is intended for educators who want to learn about issues, practices, and procedures for creating accessible Web materials for individuals with vision, hearing, motor, cognitive, and other impairments.
Patricia Rees, Web Producer; Joseph O'Connor, Coordinator, New Media Center, Pasadena City College, CA

 
Sunday, November 17, 1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. 

Register now!

Learning Styles and Technology: Specific Techniques to Help Diverse Students Be Successful
Recent advances in brain science have led to dramatic increases in our understanding of the diverse ways students learn. Furthermore, when students know their intellectual strengths, they are empowered to actively take responsibility for their learning. Due to the demands of a rapidly changing economy, helping students develop effective learning skills has never been more important. The course begins with a brief overview of learning style theories, multiple intelligences, brain-based learning, and neurodevelopmental variation that have significant applications in facilitating student success. Participants also complete a learning style/multiple intelligences inventory and share the results in an active learning process that connects learning style to teaching style. The course concludes with a demonstration and active exploration of specific teaching ideas incorporating technology and various teaching techniques to help all students be successful regardless of their learning style.
Joyce Bishop, Faculty, Psychology, Technology Trainer, Golden West College, CA

 
Sunday, November 17, 1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. 

Register now!

Addressing the Learning Needs of Education Majors in Math and Science
The Internet can provide invaluable resources that cannot be delivered using other technologies, books, or other college resources. Participants in this course develop skills in the application of technology to expand their instructional approaches and to use the Internet creatively within their curriculum. Specifically, course participants learn about using math and science curricula based in students using real-time data found on the Internet and participating in telecollaboratives. The presenters lead a discussion about the importance of addressing the math and science learning needs of education majors and the need for faculty to model inquiry-based learning. Participants also explore curriculum materials that encourage student use of the Internet in unique and compelling ways. This session should particularly benefit educators who teach math and science courses required for education majors.
Marie Nock, District Director, College Training and Development, Miami-Dade Community College District; Jorge Salinas, Professor, Chemistry; Melinda Prague, Professor, English, Miami-Dade Community College District-Wolfson Campus, FL

 
Sunday, November 17, 1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. 

Register now!

Teaching, Learning, and Technology in Style: Connecting Students, Teachers, and Knowledge
The proliferation of various information and instructional technologies, along with the rise of computer-mediated instruction as a viable instructional mode has raised many questions about teaching practices. This highly interactive, collaborative, and dynamic workshop session should particularly benefit individuals who want to gain a better understanding of learning styles and their impact on thinking, teaching, and learning with technology. This session enables participants to examine themselves and their students through the lens of the Gregorc Mind Styles model, as well as use this knowledge to plan media-rich, face-to-face, and computer-mediated instructional experiences that engage all learners and maximize student learning.
Jim Rhodes, Instructional Technologist; Charles Fox, Director, Instructional Technology Services, Polk Community College, FL; Joanne Bellovin, Director, Learning Resources, Central Florida Community College, FL

 
Sunday, November 17, 1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. 

Register now!

Integrating Information Literacy Into the Curriculum
Mandates to align with state articulation initiatives and changes in regional accreditation requirements have provided opportunities for librarians and other faculty to incorporate information literacy skills and content into the curriculum. New approaches to the concepts of managing information, along with the increasing demands on libraries and learning resource centers, have led institutions to take a variety of approaches to best accommodate student needs. Course participants explore two models for infusing information literacy activities and learning opportunities into all aspects of community college curricula, with special attention given to general education. This timely course includes the use of course management software to supplement classroom work, instruction and assessment, and paths to achieve desired student learning outcomes. The presenters also offer syllabi for new courses being taught at several League institutions, as well as other strategies for meeting new and evolving demands.
Sharon Fox, Reference Librarian, St. Louis Community College at Florissant Valley, MO; Ann Riley, Manager, Library Services, St. Louis Community College at Meramec, MO; Troy Swanson, Teaching and Learning Librarian; Leslie Warren, Instructor and Information Literacy Librarian, Moraine Valley Community College, IL

 

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